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My main Question is: Is it possible to create your own security packages?

[ NOTE: I enjoy teaching myself new skills for many different things. So please give me an answer in a 4th grade reading level. What I mean is that I won't have a clue what you're trying to tell me if the words are way to hard for me to understand. I have a hard time using a dictionary and understanding vocabulary words.]

-Thank you

closed as unclear what you're asking by TildalWave, user10211, Xander, Eric G, Steve Apr 1 '14 at 17:13

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The actual definition of a security upgrade (as used by unattended-upgrades, the package which does automated security upgrades) is this

"${distro_id}:${distro_codename}-security";

(from /etc/apt/apt.conf.d/50unattended-upgrades)

So, to create a security upgrade, you need to set up your own repository, and add the following line to /etc/apt/sources.list on every machine which you want to receive the upgrade:

deb http://yourserver.example.com/ubuntu precise-security main

(precise is the distro codename for 12.04, replace yourserver.example.com with the hostname of your repository server and main with the name of your repository)

Of course if you want to create a security upgrade for every Ubuntu user in the world, you need to become a package maintainer or a Ubuntu Developer

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If you find vulnerability(bug in Ubuntu) and make a patch for it(repair it), they are like writing software. But you should submit them to the Ubuntu team, with the vulnerability. I hope that you understand me.

  • Also I forget to mention, to write patchs you need to be familiar with C. To find vulnerabilities, you need to be familiar with C, a little bit of assembly will be helpful, you will also need to be familiar with memory management and the different type of exploits. For C I will recommend watching the lectures made by MIT open course wave, for assembly and other things look for open security training in google. Wish you good luck! – user3395407 Apr 1 '14 at 19:44

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