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Is sqlmap still traceable when we use --tor --user-agent and macchanger?

For example:

sqlmap -u "[vulnerable_website_link]" --tor --user-agent="Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; Googlebot/2.1; +http://www.google.com/bot.html)" with macchanger.
  • Changing MAC isn't necessary i think? – d36f Oct 19 '17 at 19:57
5

No. The traffic is tunnelled through ToR, so it is just as untraceable as any other use of ToR. In practice you are not traceable at all, unless you make some silly mistake like including your real name in a request.

0

Yes, everything goes through your ISP he can report attack. But the sysadmins of the site you are attacking and cops will have very hard time tracing you, if you ISP don't report the attack =D.

  • 2
    It's correct that your traffic will go through your ISP, but they won't be able to track what you're actually sending because you're using tor. So they can't/won't report you. The only thing they're able to recognise is that you're using tor, in some situations this could be enough information to connect you to some activities. – user19426 Apr 3 '14 at 10:30
  • There's always chance to trace you as I said ISP can report that he detect attack. The most secure way is to spoof your mac address(companies pretend that is unique for all machines) and connect to public wi-fi. Then TOR will only slow you, so its useless. – user3395407 Apr 3 '14 at 13:12
  • They can't report an attack because they don't know what you're doing. They can only report the usage of Tor. And Tor provides much better anonymity than simply going to a public wifi and using linklayer address spoofing - the attacked system can track you down to that place and use then e.g. security camera records to get your identity. With Tor, you don't reveal from where your ip packets come - unless your enemy has the capability to track significant areas of the global internet. – user19426 Apr 3 '14 at 14:53
  • You're using tor as a proxy, so everything you send to your ISP will be encrypted, and the ISP will have no idea about the content and destination of your packets. There is no way for the ISP to analyze your traffic, so it doesn't matter whether you're using OpenVAS, Nessus or any other vulnerability scanner - they simply can't look into your traffic. Please read about Tor and onion routing if don't believe me. Additionally, ISPs only store your connection metadata, not your actually packets, that wouldn't be possible due to the immense storage space that would occupy. – user19426 Apr 3 '14 at 20:52
  • And using security cameras to investigate major crime (like computer crime is considered to be) is actually quite realistic (although people in movies do that, too...). – user19426 Apr 3 '14 at 20:54

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