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Last year, I did a lot of work on a site as a freelancer. We wanted to put the whole thing behind HTTPS, so, for reasons I can't recall but probably expediency-related, I purchased a cert for it under my personal account at a service that sells certificates. At the end of the year, I stopped working for the client to have more personal time.

The cert will come up for renewal soon, and the certificate service sent me a notification about that prompting me to re-up the cert. The client is asking me how we can transfer the certificate to his name. I'm not sure if such a thing is possible, and I couldn't find any information about doing this online.

Is it somehow possible to transfer ownership of the certificate to my former client, or should he simply buy a new certificate with an account he controls and have his current web developer(s) put that in place of the soon-to-expire certificate that I purchased?

closed as off-topic by cpast, Graham Hill, Xander, Bob Brown, Lucas Kauffman Apr 23 '15 at 14:05

  • This question does not appear to be about Information security within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is about the purchasing policies of NameCheap, and should be taken up with them. – cpast Apr 23 '15 at 4:07
  • Just have your client buy a new certificate. If you can do so easily, help them install it, as a gesture of goodwill. – Bob Brown Apr 23 '15 at 11:12
  • Damn, you admins really look for asinine reasons to close legitimate questions, don't you? Okay, I've removed the name-dropping from the very clearly legitimate question. Re-open it, please. – Garrett Albright Apr 24 '15 at 3:52
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Just let them buy a new one.

You may be thinking of a process like in DNS ownership transfer. But there is no such thing for certificates.

Anyone who can answer an email for admin@example.com will get a certificate for example.com. It's as simple as that.

  • Okay, I figured that'd be the case, but just wanted to confirm. Thanks. – Garrett Albright Apr 24 '15 at 4:30

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