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I have installed a SSL certificate on a server. Now, I want to check if it is correctly installed and is working. I have heard from my friend that when you are installing your own certificates in keystore the alias should be same as it is in the application code which communicates using port 443 with its partners having same chain of certificates. Can you tell me how we check if a certificate is correctly installed?

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    Well... access to you web server and see the result. If the certificates are wrongly installed, the connection will be most probably dropped, or another certificate will be used. Otherwise, if the right certificate is used, then it means that is correctly installed. Moreover, I think this configuration question would be more suitable on ServerFault which deals with general server configuration issues. – WhiteWinterWolf Apr 28 '15 at 10:37
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Use SSL Labs

For a first test, run the URL through SSL Labs:

This will tell you if the certificate is correctly installed when looking at it from the outside.

Keystore alias probably won't matter

Now concerning the "keystore alias": That is only visible from inside the server. So you will have to ask the developers of your specific software if their software cares about the alias. (I don't think it should care about it.)

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  • I was going through some posts on stackexchange and I found one post suggesting the use of below command to check connectivity: [openssl s_client -connect servername:443 ] will it work in my case? – shinek Apr 28 '15 at 14:05
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I just wanted to point/link to something that I find very useful.

This page, on top of providing a very good explanation of some of the warnings we do get using SSL Test from SSL Labs (they do the same), also provides Windows powershell snippets (or the full script) that will help you getting a better configuration in case you are using Windows in the webserver.

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