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Today - I saw a question about passwords usage in cars. Have we developed anything besides passwords for IT? Is there are any other solution out there for my common-folk-direct-to-business-client-power-paying-user? Besides having to login with a password, is there are any alternatives to this? I saw this question here about password alternatives, and this made me think as well, the question is a little old right now. Is someone working on a new way to provide security to software not based on passwords?

I saw things like this "image file" idea, and yes, I know about the "Don't roll your own", so, I'm not trying to do anything like that.

Tl;DR: Are there any major players on Security Information working on a alternative for password systems?

I intend to learn about modern systems or research on the subject of systems that do not use any kind of password based scheme. This includes any kind of alphanumerical combination that the user has to memorize to access the system.

closed as too broad by StackzOfZtuff, user45139, WhiteWinterWolf, RoraΖ, M'vy Aug 21 '15 at 12:38

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    Biometrics and MFA are the 2 major initiatives. – schroeder Aug 20 '15 at 19:13
  • @schroeder Hi there! If you would like to answer with real applications done with those two methods, that would be awesome! :D – Malavos Aug 20 '15 at 19:18
  • What do you mean "real applications"? – schroeder Aug 20 '15 at 19:24
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    There are literally thousands (millions). My phone uses my fingerprint (biometrics) to unlock certain apps (Lastpass), and MFA is becoming a standard in many web apps (banks, Google, Microsoft, etc.) – schroeder Aug 20 '15 at 19:29
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    It all comes down the the MFA structure: something you know, something you are, and something you have. What you are changes over time (just ask pregnant ladies), something you have can be lost (just ask me), but something you know can persist the longest without modification (just ask my co-worker's Post-It note). Passwords are the most reliable, even though they are the most insecure. That's why combining them is seen as the better method, and why they will be used as a backup. – schroeder Aug 20 '15 at 19:52

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