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I recently decided to fix up an old laptop by replacing some missing parts. I installed Kali 2.0.

I also figured the most secure OS should be an OS designed for use by security professionals; although I am completely aware the system is only as secure as its user. I purchased two pcie cards capable of monitor mode according to the aircrack wiki; and installed plenty of software, most of which I will probably never use.

I understand as long as my system works as intended once the wireless transceivers arrive in the mail I can receive wireless LAN packets without actually connecting to the router.

What if I want to communicate completely anonymously? I am curious if I will be able to also transmit and receive as if I am an already connected device. Is that possible? Is that actually anonymous? How will the legitimate host react to packets it is not expecting?

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    What are you trying to achieve ? Is that actually secure? secure against what ? How will the legitimate host react to packets it is not expecting? it depends, if the network is unencrypted, your spoofed packet will appear as coming from the real host, if the network is encrypted and you don't have the key, you won't be able to forge a valid packet and whatever packet you make will be ignored because it's invalid. Commented Aug 25, 2015 at 19:59
  • @AndréB. Sorry, what I should have wrote is Is that actually anonymous? How can this question be improved?
    – motoku
    Commented Aug 25, 2015 at 20:00
  • You can edit the question to correct it. And no, it's never completely anonymous - there are ways to triangulate the physical location of a signal by using multiple antennas (some enterprise multi-AP solutions use this to pinpoint rogue APs), but besides that, you will be anonymous if the transmitted packets don't contain any identifying info. Commented Aug 25, 2015 at 20:03
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    I also figured the most secure OS should be an OS designed for use by security professionals : Not really. Kali comes with a bunch of tools which can be used against you or your network. Many of the applications used by Kali are not different from other distributions (like openssh), an thus inherit the same security risks. If you want something safer, try to go minimalist and only install what you need.
    – lepe
    Commented Aug 27, 2015 at 1:14

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What if I want to communicate completely anonymously?

Wireless is relatively anonymous from the perspective that you, as a person, won't be easily identified unless your traffic gives you away. That said, your location is identifiable using triangulation and your hardware device ID (MAC) will identify the device used unless you're able to override it.

I am curious if I will be able to also transmit and receive as if I am an already connected device. Is that possible?

Yes, sort of. If you can inject successfully and receive successfully you can pretend to be a device already on the network but to fully emulate it isn't reasonable to do. It depends on what you're trying to accomplish.

Is that actually anonymous?

See above. Depends on you and what you're attempting to accomplish. The amount of anonymity that is possible depends on how you behave on that network. Simply listening is completely anonymous as you're not sending anything out. Interacting in any way is less so and the amount of anonymity will drop as you interact more and more.

How will the legitimate host react to packets it is not expecting?

Depends on the packets. In many cases you'll get a RST response or nothing at all. If you're attempting to modify or affect an existing connection that can be difficult at best. TCP has a number of controls in place to try to prevent this.

You can inject ARP packets to tell the system you're someone else on the network in an attempt to intercept traffic and in some cases this can work for you to man-in-the-middle a victim system's connections. As long as your device acts and behaves like the router the victim computer expects you could insert somewhat smoothly into the stream.

If this doesn't address what you're looking for please try to clarify the question and make it more specific.

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