Linked Questions

4
votes
0answers
1k views

Are there any detection scripts available for WPA2 Key Reinstallation Attacks (KRACKs)? [duplicate]

I have just read about a new weaknesses in the WPA2 protocol called KRACKs. The authors of the paper says that they will release scripts that can be used to test if a network is exploitable when they ...
0
votes
1answer
225 views

Can KRACK be used to obtain wifi credentials that could be used to normally connect to an AP? [duplicate]

I have a pretty simple question about KRACK. From what I have read it would be very common to be able to forge, decrypt, delay and block client packets as well as AP packets using KRACK. Does this ...
142
votes
9answers
18k views

To sufficiently protect against KRACK is patching the client, the AP, or both, required?

Following on from this question, I am unclear on which of the following steps are sufficient to protect a WPA2-based wifi connection from the KRACK flaw: Patching the AP (e.g. router) Patching the ...
118
votes
3answers
18k views

Why wasn't the KRACK exploit discovered sooner? [closed]

From what I've read, the issue is as simple as performing step 3 of a 4-step handshake and the consequences of performing that step more than once. Considering the complexity of these kinds of ...
33
votes
4answers
8k views

Does KRACK break TLS?

Apologies if this is already answered in the whitepaper, I'm not going to get chance to read it for a few days due to a hectic schedule, but I am already fielding questions from non-techies reading ...
27
votes
2answers
21k views

Strength of WEP, WPA and WPA 2 PSK

I know there are three method for wifi security. What are the relative strengths of the password encryption in WEP, WPA and WPA2 PSK?
23
votes
3answers
19k views

How to check if a Wi-Fi network is safe to connect to?

I always feel scared to connect to hotel, airport Wi-Fi etc. I feel that if the Wi-Fi router is hacked, my personal information can be collected by a hacker. How can I determine if a Wi-Fi network is ...
35
votes
1answer
4k views

How does a nonce reset allow for decryption?

I'm sure that by now most InfoSec-lovers have heard about KRACK. If you haven't, check out this great explaination by a fellow StackExchanger. It's a new attack on WPA2 which allows for decryption ...
9
votes
3answers
6k views

If WPA2-PSK is insecure, what other options do home users have?

from what I'm reading online it seems that one can land attacks and successfully crack a WPA2-PSK wifi network, is that true and if it is, how home users can secure their networks? I seen an ...
3
votes
2answers
407 views

WiFi security in 2018

On my wireless network I have implemented WPA2 protocol with AES encryption. Last year there was several warnings that WPA2 is broken, hacked. Now there are announcements that WPA3 is comming in 2018. ...
2
votes
3answers
374 views

What are some best practices for WiFi security, in light of recently discovered vulnerabilities?

In the past few months, we've seen the revelation of several WiFi vulnerabilities (eg KRACK). It doesn't look like NIST has updated any of its best practices. How should we configure our enterprise ...
10
votes
1answer
570 views

Consequences of the WPA2 KRACK attack on older Windows and iOS clients

What are the real-world consequences of the WPA2 KRACK attacks on older Windows systems (XP/Vista) and iOS devices (10 and older) that will not be patched? I am aware of another question on this site ...
3
votes
2answers
380 views

How do I secure my home Wi-Fi network in light of KRACK? [duplicate]

Now that KRACK has been discovered to exploit WPA2, is it still possible to secure my home Wi-Fi network? If so, what steps should I take to secure it against KRACK attacks? Will there now be a need ...
0
votes
0answers
66 views

How can HTTPS be secure when used over open/cracked WiFi? [duplicate]

In the top answer to Consequences of the WPA2 KRACK attack it is recommended: Generally, use HTTPS for anything that needs to be secure (you should do this anyway, also over ethernet, but ...