Linked Questions

39
votes
10answers
6k views

Is there any point in using 'strong' passwords?

Let's say I'm setting up a new account on a website. Should I bother using a strong password? My reasoning is this: Password strength is a rough measure of how long it would take to brute-force my ...
22
votes
7answers
2k views

At what length does a password stop making sense?

I'm going to recommend that our users start using a password manager and start creating strong random passwords. Though I don't know what size of a password to recommend. Is it possible for a ...
25
votes
4answers
6k views

Is a passphrase-protected SSH private key susceptible to a dictionary attack?

If I have a passphrase-protected SSH private key, AND if this passphrase is sufficiently random and long (say, 20-, 30-, 40-characters long, or even more!), AND if I make this private key of ...
19
votes
5answers
13k views

How unlikely is it that a Google Doc link is guessed?

Most (if not all) of us know that a Google Doc link looks something like this: https://docs.google.com/document/d/13P3p5bA3lslqEJT1BGeTL1L5ZrQq_fSov_56jT9vf0I/edit There are becoming several tools (...
18
votes
4answers
4k views

At what point does adding more iterations to PBKDF2 provide no extra security?

If my true passphrase is used only to generate a hash which is used as the cipher's actual key, doesn't that mean it's possible to try and brute force the cipher itself? I know it would take an ...
10
votes
3answers
6k views

RSA key length vs. Shor's algorithm

I have just read a passage in Zeilinger's book about quantum world. My question is: Suppose there exist quantum computers. Given that a quantum computer can use Shor's algorithm, what key length ...
7
votes
3answers
2k views

Why do we have such big keys?

In Chapter 7 of Applied Cryptography, Bruce Schneier claims that, due to thermodynamic limitations, "brute-force attacks against 256-bit [symmetric] keys will be infeasible until computers are built ...
8
votes
1answer
8k views

PGP RSA key size - encryption/decryption time

From what I've read, PGP only uses the pub/priv keys for encrypting/decrypting a symmetric key used for actually encrypting/decrypting data. I'd reasonably assume that longer asymmetric keys wouldn't ...
5
votes
2answers
3k views

Are RSA 2048, ECDSA, and the SHA uncrackable in the sense that AES-256 is uncrackable?

The answer https://security.stackexchange.com/a/25392 has seemingly shown that AES-256 will not be directly cracked for at least the next 200 years (unless we manage to harvest the energy output of ...
10
votes
2answers
651 views

Realistically, how much added security does having a passphrase on a ssh key have?

Let's assume ssh key brute force is unrealistic. It seems to me your greatest vulnerability would be someone gaining access to a client filesystem. If that's the case then key loggers and a host of ...
3
votes
4answers
3k views

One-Time-Passwords resist against bruteforce attacks? Immune Alternative?

Does a One-Time-Password like Google Authenticator or YubiKey protect against brute force attacks with unlimited computer power? If not, what algorithems are immune to bruteforce attacks against ...
3
votes
4answers
3k views

openssl blowfish key limited to 256 bits?

I get the following error if I give a key that is greater than 64 hex caracters (64*4=256 bits). According to this official document, blowfish is able to support key from 32 to 448 bits. Variable ...
-1
votes
1answer
4k views

How long does it take to crack a 100-letter long winrar password? [closed]

i´m interested in how long time it would take for a super computer dedicated to crack to crack a 100-letter long winrar password. The password contains Lowercase, Uppercase, Digits, ...