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A public-key infrastructure (PKI) is a set of hardware, software, people, policies, and procedures needed to create, manage, distribute, use, store, and revoke digital certificates. In cryptography, a PKI is an arrangement that binds public keys with respective user identities by means of a certificate authority (CA). There are three main categories of PKI: Web / SSL certs, corporate networks, and Government ID / ePassport.

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In this particular example, the usage of the FreeSoft certificate and key pair is unknown. It will, presumably, be used for something, but the example and the certificate do not make it clear what th …
answered Apr 19 '12 by bethlakshmi
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From what I've seen, no - usually the certificate signing requests (CSR or PKCS10) are all about what the cert should look like, or what the cert will be describing. How it's stored when it's retriev …
answered Sep 12 '12 by bethlakshmi
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Encryption is typically described as changing a peice of data from something readable by anyone (cleartext) to something undecipherable (ciphertext). Then decryption is the reverse process. Any time …
answered Nov 23 '12 by bethlakshmi
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OK, there's a long answer: The easy way - if you are only checking that the certificate came from a trusted issuer, then you only need the collection of CAs that may be issuing certificates for you. …
answered Jan 25 '11 by bethlakshmi
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A self signed certificate is completely fine if you are willing to explicitly trust it. The reason a certificate is signed is that an entity more trusted than the certificate holder is adding authori …
answered Dec 31 '12 by bethlakshmi
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Have no fears on being new - you've hit on a weird one. I swear I've seen *.arm used as an extension - but not often. Typically certificates (which include the public key as part of the data) are st …
answered Aug 21 '12 by bethlakshmi
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Must/should I fetch all CRLs of the complete chain to check the certificates validity? Absolutely. A CA builds a CRL only for the certificates it issues. Status of the CA itself must be checked via …
answered Jul 13 '11 by bethlakshmi
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A PKCS12 (*.p12, or *.pfx) is absolutely the easy way. There are quite a few common tools out there for combining a key pair and certificate into a p12. My favorite is OpenSSL, since it works on eve …
answered Dec 31 '12 by bethlakshmi
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I think the answer here is subjective. Who you should trust depends on your purpose as well as your belief in what entity will manage the data and the process in an appropriate manner. Just like I w …
answered Mar 11 '11 by bethlakshmi
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A few new thoughts: 1 - Certificates are typically delivered with the message that they protect. The other answers covered this. There is typically no case of Bob getting Alice's certificate ahea …
answered Dec 11 '13 by bethlakshmi
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According to the RFC on Certificate Validation - RFC 3280 - Section 6.2: The selection of one or more trusted CAs is a local decision. A system may provide any one of its trusted CAs as the …
answered Aug 21 '12 by bethlakshmi
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OK, the answer so far are fundamentally on track, but I'm going to try to take your questions as they came in: * where did this public key come from? A public key is part of a key pair used in asym …
answered Oct 11 '11 by bethlakshmi
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I found an example here that is a lot more detailed than the text you are quoting from: http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc2527 Section 3.2 and 3.3. This seemed particularly relevant from Section 3.3.1 …
answered Aug 27 '12 by bethlakshmi
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The general metrics is that the key space should be big enough that the key cannot be guessed within the time the transmission should be protected. I'm afraid I don't know off the top of my head what …
answered Jan 7 '13 by bethlakshmi
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The big one - IMO - is the speed. I've used a couple different plugs and configurations to enable OCSP in browsers, and even in a lab environment where the OCSP server is unburdened and one hop away …
answered May 23 '11 by bethlakshmi

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