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Address Space Layout Randomisation (ASLR) is a technology used to help prevent shellcode from being successful. It does this by randomly offsetting the location of modules and certain in-memory structures.

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Because 12 bits is enough to provide effective, if not perfect, security. The malware gets only one shot at injecting the buffer overflow. If it fails, the application will most like just crash with …
answered Feb 5 '14 by John Deters
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There's not too much to be gained in actually exploiting it just for a demo. You should be able to demo making your system crash from a phone borrowed from your audience, and that should adequately a …
answered Aug 17 '12 by John Deters
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No. Many attacks rely on the address of a library routine, and don't care where the executable is loaded. Pretty much any fixed address can be exploited.
answered Oct 27 '16 by John Deters
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strategy than you realized. You don't have to build any shellcode or carry the attacks through to completion. It just has to be enough to convince the other engineers that you can inject arbitrary values into the instruction pointer. That's when the benefits of ASLR actually kick in. …
answered Sep 30 '16 by John Deters