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Results tagged with Search options answers only user 12578

Details on how data is being kept in memory/on disks, most frequently being applied to databases, media banks and backup-recovery solutions.

11
votes
If your computer is able to use the API without a password, then the information has to be stored somewhere on your system. The point of storing it in the environment variable is to make it so that y …
answered Feb 1 '14 by AJ Henderson
3
votes
I wouldn't consider this a major security issue as the values are limited to only your system's access to the third party sites. It is less desirable, but the values can be easily invalidated without …
answered Nov 19 '14 by AJ Henderson
2
votes
While not a direct answer to your question, my personal suggestion would be to use a standard file hosting service that meets your needs and perform your own client side encryption and decryption. Th …
answered Jan 2 '13 by AJ Henderson
1
vote
Authorize.net provides a feature that lets you have the payment processed on their server and they supply what is basically a receipt token. This might be your best bet until you can get your system …
answered Dec 6 '12 by AJ Henderson
1
vote
I would challenge that using most third party SAAS data storage services are MORE secure than e-mail. Some of them even use encryption on the communication to prevent unauthorized access to the data …
answered Dec 20 '12 by AJ Henderson
1
vote
It really depends more on the services you are accessing than on your local system. If you are not storing passwords, not using persistent logins and the services you are accessing are following good …
answered Mar 29 '13 by AJ Henderson
1
vote
You should rework your entire system. It is inherently far less secure than it should be. There is no good reason that you should be storing encryption keys that could be used to impersonate your de …
answered Nov 6 '14 by AJ Henderson
4
votes
What you are talking about is the infamous problem of DRM. There is unfortunately no way to do this. The fundamental problem is one of trust. In current modern systems, the user is god. They have …
answered Jun 27 '13 by AJ Henderson
5
votes
This is the magical issue of DRM and the short answer is that there is no good answer and if you come up with one, you will be very wealthy. In order for the application to access the key, it has to …
answered Mar 14 '13 by AJ Henderson