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Results tagged with Search options answers only user 12578

SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) and/or TLS (Transport Layer Security)

0
votes
It depends. If you used *.example.com as your common name, then you don't need to change anything as both would be valid for both certs, but if you made the certs specifically for example.com and dev …
answered Aug 18 '14 by AJ Henderson
0
votes
They must not have understood what you are asking. TLS doesn't protect local encrypted passwords. TLS protects your password when it is sent to a server. If you don't have to enter a password when …
answered Mar 24 '14 by AJ Henderson
1
vote
A self signed certificate is fine as long as you ensure it is strongly generated. It won't have implied trust, but if it is going between two end points you know, then you can independently establish …
answered Mar 20 '13 by AJ Henderson
1
vote
1) I'm not sure what you mean. There are numerous reasons a handshake could fail, however it should be noted that generally an untrusted certificate will not result in the handshake failing, but rath …
answered Dec 28 '13 by AJ Henderson
5
votes
This is quite a common practice. In fact, most large websites use load-balancing, which distributes the load of the site across multiple servers. There are two ways this can be done. The first is s …
answered Jul 8 '14 by AJ Henderson
4
votes
You have to have a certificate, but it can be one you make yourself. SSL (which is what HTTPS provides) requires a certificate for secure communication because that is the foundation of the encrypt …
answered Jul 8 '13 by AJ Henderson
1
vote
It's the same thing. We couldn't ditch CAs because CAs are a necessary part of the trust system. You can't trust any hosts if you don't have someone out there verifying that hosts actually are who t …
answered Nov 4 '14 by AJ Henderson
3
votes
The big key with 128 bit algorithms on SSL was/is that 128 bit encryption algorithms fall under US Export Control laws and thus any 128 bit encryption designed in the US couldn't be exported to certai …
answered Jan 3 '13 by AJ Henderson
0
votes
Client certificates are used for authentication and key negotiation in SSL. A session key is still used, thus their should be no difference after a connection is established. I'm not sure how much, …
answered Mar 18 '13 by AJ Henderson
3
votes
SSL only protects communication between your system and Facebook's system. Since Facebook is a willing participant, they simply provide access to their database which stores the conversations in the …
answered Jul 31 '13 by AJ Henderson
1
vote
SSL does protect the actual files being accessed. It actually occurs at the IP level, but the main part of the URL leaks via DNS. This is why you can only have one SSL cert per IP address, because u …
answered May 15 '14 by AJ Henderson
0
votes
An SSL connection is pretty much just like a normal connection in terms of what people can do with it. The only difference is that it blocks attackers that are external to the communication. You kno …
answered Mar 13 '13 by AJ Henderson
13
votes
The RSA weakness only applies to the key exchange and establishing the session. If the attacker doesn't catch this, the actual communication itself is far more resistant to brute force with the 256 b …
answered Jun 18 '14 by AJ Henderson
3
votes
They don't make the connection any more secure in terms of the encryption being hard to break, but they do make it more secure in that it is less likely an intruder was able to trick a CA in to issuin …
answered Mar 27 '14 by AJ Henderson
3
votes
Identity not verified means that the certificates being provided by the server are not able to be verified by Chrome. Clicking on where the lock symbol would be should give you additional details abo …
answered Jul 18 '14 by AJ Henderson

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