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Results tagged with Search options user 2138

Cryptography is the practice and study of logical means used to achieve information confidentiality, integrity and authenticity. It covers, among other things, encryption (making some data unreadable except for those who know a given secret element, called a key), data hashing (in particular for password storage) and digital signatures (provable integrity and authenticity with non-repudiation).

10
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-bit hash function such as MD5 is not 36^32 (about 6.3e49), but 2^128 (about 3.4e38). That's 11 orders of magnitude! Cryptography is hard. If you don't know precisely what you are doing (and in many …
answered Jul 25 '11 by a CVn
1
vote
TL;DR: Use a proper key derivation function instead of some homegrown scheme. the hash can easily be extracted and brute-forced externally. I think you are very much underestimating the diffic …
answered Jun 28 '17 by a CVn
43
votes
Say what you actually want to do is to make your encrypted email look like spam. OK, how to accomplish that? One possible way would be to take the ciphertext and break it down into managable chunks o …
answered Nov 8 '13 by a CVn
7
votes
going to attack the cryptosystem, not the cryptography, anyway. (Obligatory XKCD link.) PRNG attacks have broken otherwise properly implemented and theoretically secure cryptosystems before, and one would be a fool to think that has happened for the last time. …
answered Dec 13 '12 by a CVn
41
votes
I find some of your comments curious. Particularly, I'm trying to stay away from methods that are reliant on an application, and do it manually - as I'd feel more in 'control'. and I don't n …
answered Jun 27 '17 by a CVn
51
votes
semiprime, but (at least in public) we don't yet know how to build a large enough quantum computer that actually works. That's part of what the push toward so-called post-quantum cryptography is about …
answered Mar 13 '17 by a CVn
4
votes
Actually, the naiive approach of just grabbing a key from a keyserver isn't vulnerable so much to a man-in-the-middle attack as to a poisoning attack. In a poisoning attack, an attacker provides an a …
answered Jul 25 by a CVn