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A Certificate Authority is the collection of hardware, software, and people responsible for issuing certificates in a hierarchical PKI. CAs may be public, as in SSL / TLS and government IDs, or private, as in corporate infrastructures. The primary responsibility of a public CA is to verify the identity of an applicant before issuing them a certificate.

25
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Congratulations! Sounds like a major find. First, generate some proof. The github.com SSL certificate sounds like a great start. Make sure you keep all the network traces you need to show exactly wha …
answered Jun 10 '15 by paj28
2
votes
This approach can work; a notable example is how Facebook photos work - there are separate photo servers that are passed tokens in a similar manner to how you suggest (at least it used to, not checked …
answered Jan 21 '14 by paj28
3
votes
Like this: CA machine: ca.crt, ca.key Server: ca.crt, server.crt, server.key Clients: client.crt, client.key, ca.crt Notably, ca.key does NOT go on the server. If the server is compromised, then t …
answered Sep 8 '14 by paj28