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A public-key infrastructure (PKI) is a set of hardware, software, people, policies, and procedures needed to create, manage, distribute, use, store, and revoke digital certificates. In cryptography, a PKI is an arrangement that binds public keys with respective user identities by means of a certificate authority (CA). There are three main categories of PKI: Web / SSL certs, corporate networks, and Government ID / ePassport.

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Deploying internally is easy. The hard part is getting all the procedures right so that it is convincingly uneasy to obtain a fake certificate. This is the condition for signatures: a signature has an …
answered Jul 20 '15 by Tom Leek
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Ardi does not obtain his private key from the PKI. The PKI obtains Ardi's public key from Ardi. Ardi owns a public/private key pair: a public key and a private key that "dance together" (they are two …
answered Nov 3 '14 by Tom Leek
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Revocation really is cancelling the certificate issuance -- the CA which has signed the certificate announces that it now denies it. A root CA being self-issued, it cannot be revoked. A root CA, by de …
answered May 28 '15 by Tom Leek
2
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When a private key is stolen, the balance is between restoring security, and maintaining business. For instance, for a SSL server, if the private key is stolen, then the attacker can impersonate the s …
answered Nov 1 '13 by Tom Leek
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There are subtleties about such comparisons. To crack symmetric encryption, like this password-based encryption of the private key, one needs to one either of the following: guess the password; gue …
answered Feb 4 '16 by Tom Leek
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In SSL/TLS, the server sends his certificate as part of a chain. The client should ascertain the server's public key, and use it to finish the handshake. How the client should "guess" and "validate" …
answered Jan 5 '12 by Tom Leek
3
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X.509 is wide and versatile and, in theory, anything goes. In practice, I assume that you are talking about a SSL/TLS situation, probably as part of a HTTPS web site. The server sends his certificate …
answered Aug 8 '12 by Tom Leek
2
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In a PKI, the signatures on digital certificates don't create trust; they transfer it. You trust the information contained in a certificate (a name/public key association) because you verified the sig …
answered Sep 9 '13 by Tom Leek
8
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For the commonly used cryptographic algorithms, the public key can be recomputed from the private key. An edge case can be a RSA key with a big public exponent (i.e. not the traditional 65537) and wit …
answered Feb 12 '13 by Tom Leek
9
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In version 1 of the SSH protocol, the server has a RSA key (always) and the client asymmetrically encrypts a random blob with the server's public key. The random blob is then used as basis for the ses …
answered Feb 27 '13 by Tom Leek
4
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It is not a matter of wildcards. The behaviour you observe is due to the following: if there is a Subject Alt Name extension in the certificate, then the Common Name part of the DN is simply ignored. …
answered Dec 17 '13 by Tom Leek
3
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PKCS#8 is a flexible standard; it is a syntax for encoding private keys with optional password-based encryption. The security level that can be achieved depends on the algorithm used to convert the pa …
answered Oct 20 '14 by Tom Leek
2
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A certificate is basically a binding between an identity and a public key, but there are details: The notion of "identity" which is most adequate for your situation is not necessarily the same as th …
answered Apr 10 '14 by Tom Leek
6
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You are trying to do authorization with a physical device meant for authentication. This rarely works well. A smart card is used to authenticate the user, in that it contains a private key which rema …
answered Apr 7 '14 by Tom Leek
1
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In some countries, there is a specific legal framework for such things; of course, every country has its own... In France, it is the Référentiel Général de Sécurité, which feeds on Common Criteria. Th …
answered Mar 13 '13 by Tom Leek

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