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Encryption is the process of transforming plaintext using a cipher to make it unreadable to anyone except those possessing the key.

12
votes
be able to find out the username(s) in any case, and design your system to be secure with that assumption. Second, don't worry about the encryption (or hashing etc.) method being public, either … . That's Kerckhoff's principle — the encryption method should be treated as public, the only thing that needs to be secret should be the key (or password, in this case). There are many good reasons for …
answered Oct 30 '12 by Ilmari Karonen
2
votes
users have to encrypt data in another app and copy it manually into the sharing app. Most of these trust issues will still be present even if the encryption and sharing functions are separated. The … main advantage of doing so is that, with a separate encryption app, the user could, in principle, run it in a sandbox that is not allowed to communicate with anything else, except for reading the …
answered May 22 '14 by Ilmari Karonen
3
votes
encryption (that is, for example, file or e-mail encryption, as opposed to just temporarily encrypting data to transfer it over an untrusted network) do include some way to detect when an incorrect key … message authentication code in the encrypted data (or using an authenticated encryption mode). The main purpose of a MAC is to protect the encrypted data against tampering, but as a side effect, it also …
answered Jul 31 '12 by Ilmari Karonen
5
votes
The user and campaign IDs seem to be hexadecimal numbers (of 32 and 48 bits respectively). I see no obvious structure in them — they're definitely not printable ASCII byte strings. The 24-char "resu …
answered Jun 29 '12 by Ilmari Karonen
7
votes
One potentially significant advantage of not using the same private key for both the lobby and the game servers is that, even if one or more of the game server keys is compromised, the lobby server ke …
answered Dec 31 '12 by Ilmari Karonen
1
vote
In the RSA cryptosystem, encryption, decryption, signing and signature verification are all done with the same mathematical operation: modular exponentiation. Also, mathematically, there is no … their choosing. Of course, in practice, there are some limitations to this. For example, when using RSA for encryption, it's important for the number x being encrypted to always be unpredictable; if …
answered May 7 '17 by Ilmari Karonen
1
vote
For each data record (or set of records, if the same users can always access all records in a set), create a random encryption key. Then encrypt a copy of this key with the key of each user who is … notification. One option would be to have your app also check the entered password against its own database, e.g. by storing a hash of the user's encryption key (derived from the password with PBKDF2) in …
answered Jan 7 '13 by Ilmari Karonen
3
votes
Note: This answer was posted before the question was migrated from Cryptography Stack Exchange. As such, it only addresses the purely cryptographic aspects of the question. What you could do is …
answered Nov 30 '13 by Ilmari Karonen
14
votes
What you're missing is that your token is signed (or, more precisely, authenticated with a symmetric key) but not encrypted. If you take the token in your question above, split it into three pieces a …
answered Sep 27 by Ilmari Karonen
6
votes
If this is indeed a simple password hash, we might be able to use Google to crack it. Base64 is hard to search for, though, with all those slashes and plus signs, so let's first convert that hash int …
answered Oct 20 '11 by Ilmari Karonen
2
votes
security holes that make them insecure regardless of what encryption might or might not be used. Thus, allowing users to establish an HTTPS connection to your site using one of those ancient browsers is …
answered Jun 29 '12 by Ilmari Karonen