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A public-key infrastructure (PKI) is a set of hardware, software, people, policies, and procedures needed to create, manage, distribute, use, store, and revoke digital certificates. In cryptography, a PKI is an arrangement that binds public keys with respective user identities by means of a certificate authority (CA). There are three main categories of PKI: Web / SSL certs, corporate networks, and Government ID / ePassport.

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The answer by @discreet gives good links, but I want to add my understanding. Without knowing which vendor you bought your PKI from, it's hard to know exactly what the PIN is doing inside, because un …
answered Aug 12 '15 by Mike Ounsworth
1
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To give an exact mathematical answer I'd need more details like which encryption cipher, which public key algorithm, etc. But generally speaking yes, it is at least as difficult. The public key part …
answered Feb 4 '16 by Mike Ounsworth
2
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This is a great chance to flesh-out the basics of how CAs work. I will assume that we're talking about root CAs here, since renewing a subordinate CA is not really a big deal. How often do CA's re …
answered Aug 6 '17 by Mike Ounsworth
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Your main question is: Problems with H can weaken the scheme; this is why people stopped using MD5 and are moving away from SHA1. So why not just skip step 3 and encrypt c directly? Yes, MD5 can …
answered May 30 '16 by Mike Ounsworth
2
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I completely agree with you -- you seem to understand the complexities of the issue. Let's look at the extremes: CRL Lifetime = subCA Lifetime. ==> the CRL is completely useless; you have no abili …
answered Oct 13 '16 by Mike Ounsworth
2
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You are correct that it would not cause any harm to the certificates that were already issued, but it does call into question which certificates are still trustworthy, and which are not. It's safer an …
answered May 27 '15 by Mike Ounsworth
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I think you need to be more specific about what you mean by "What happens if Alice explicitly does not trust C." Alice, and only Alice, has decided not to trust C, or A has revoked C's certificate? M …
answered May 12 '15 by Mike Ounsworth
1
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There's a bunch of questions rolled in there. Untangling: Do I have to pick an asymmetric signing algorithm to create that initial public/private key pair? An asymmetric encryption algorithm …
answered Oct 25 '18 by Mike Ounsworth
1
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I am not an a lawyer, but I imagine you're dealing with two different systems; the internet (policies set by tech companies), and the law (policies set by governments and courts): Certificate Authori …
answered Sep 4 '18 by Mike Ounsworth
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@SebastianOerding's answer is good, but I'll try a different explanation by building on the concept of a cross-certificate. Cross certificate Let's say you have two separate CAs, and you want the cl …
answered Jul 24 '18 by Mike Ounsworth
0
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One argument that comes to mind is that often designers want the cluster to be agnostic about which node a user is connected to; ie the user gets the same output regardless of which node did the proce …
answered Jun 11 '15 by Mike Ounsworth
25
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What you are describing sounds a lot like how I share PGP keys with my friends. It works fine when we're all nerds and adding keys manually and are chatting on the phone while we do it, but this appro …
answered Mar 17 '16 by Mike Ounsworth
1
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Your question about when / how to renew the CA key is a good one, but I'm afraid that it doesn't have a generic answer; it depends on which applications are consuming those certificates and how they e …
answered Jun 21 '16 by Mike Ounsworth
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[The two existing answers are good, but since they have no upvotes, I'll try to provide a canonical answer] In general, No. I mean, Z can revoke Y, which automatically revokes X and all other certs …
answered Jul 29 '17 by Mike Ounsworth
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This is one of those tricky subtle wordings. The full meaning of the RFC may not be obvious on the first reading. From your question (emphasis mine): Trust Anchor: The combination of a trusted pub …
answered Dec 24 '17 by Mike Ounsworth

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