Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
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Key management involves the entire key life-cycle: generation, exchange, storage, safeguarding, use, vetting, revocation, replacement and retirement.

5
votes
Don't roll your own crypto. If you decide to invent your own format, then you are on your own. The history of cryptography is full of people who invented their own format, and failed horribly; and, mo …
answered Feb 4 '13 by Thomas Pornin
4
votes
You are sharing IV: cells from a given row will use the same IV. This is bad. Don't do that. You use CBC; this is a mode which is known to have a few security issues (in particular, it is sensitive t …
answered Jan 24 '13 by Thomas Pornin
10
votes
Knowledge is power. In other words, if the user must be able to perform some action and nobody else should be able to do the same action, then there must be some value (a "key") that only the user kno …
answered Jul 21 '15 by Thomas Pornin
6
votes
Having the same key for several systems might be a bad idea because this necessarily means that the private key travelled between systems. The more a key travels, the less private it can be. It really …
answered Jul 18 '13 by Thomas Pornin
7
votes
As a general rule, I advise against designing security through the use of voodoo ritual. Unfortunately, frequent key renewal has all the hallmarks of a procedure meant to appease fearsome deities, as …
answered Jan 16 '13 by Thomas Pornin
3
votes
Since encryption and signatures are distinct operations, it makes sense to have distinct keys. This really boils down to the need for distinct lifecycle management characteristics (backup or not back …
answered Aug 11 '14 by Thomas Pornin
3
votes
The only security improvement from your scheme (over the situation where you do not apply it) lies on the following: An attacker would have to copy the entire file to be able to decrypt files offl …
answered Aug 21 '13 by Thomas Pornin
12
votes
If it was possible (with existing technology) to rebuild the private key from the public key, then everybody would be doing it. Asymmetric algorithms are designed to avoid that. In the case of RSA, r …
answered Mar 26 '13 by Thomas Pornin
4
votes
Physical storage characteristics are not part of the definition of PKCS#11. PKCS#11 is an API: it defines the behaviour of the library with regards to function calls, not with regards to actual techno …
answered Mar 16 '16 by Thomas Pornin
25
votes
The public key is public, meaning that everybody can know it without endangering security. No problem in putting it in an email, then. The potential issue would be an active attacker modifying the em …
answered Feb 24 '13 by Thomas Pornin
7
votes
There is no 100% reliable way to hide a secret of any type, be it a RSA private key or any other kind of object, within an application in such a way that it would resist reverse engineering. All those …
answered Feb 13 '13 by Thomas Pornin
18
votes
Key expiration makes sense only if you can predict a point in time where the key will cease to be secure, due to advances in Science, technology, or lack of interest on your part with regards to prote …
answered Feb 27 '13 by Thomas Pornin
7
votes
Your problem is transmission of a secret piece of data; that the piece of data is a cryptographic key is mostly irrelevant (it just means that it is really secret). Thus, what you want boils down to m …
answered Jan 12 '13 by Thomas Pornin
22
votes
There is a standard for that, and, more generally, for all communications with a PKI. It is called Certificate Management Protocol (CMP). Revocation requests are specified in section 5.3.9. Now, find …
answered Jun 17 '15 by Thomas Pornin
14
votes
Anything which is encrypted with PBE (as in "Password Based Encryption") can be the subject of an offline dictionary attack (i.e.: the attacker tries potential passwords). This is a worry unless you h …
answered Oct 17 '11 by Thomas Pornin

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