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A vulnerability which is known to the designers, implementers, or operators of the system, but has not been corrected.

5
votes
There is some information and many pointers on this page. The common idea is that Firewire allows DMA: the plugged device can read and write physical memory at will (this allows fast data transfer wit …
answered Sep 17 '11 by Thomas Pornin
5
votes
Strictly speaking, no, mutual authentication does not protect against POODLE. Some details may matter, though. The core of the POODLE attack is that there is a way, with SSL 3.0, to alter some record …
answered Apr 14 '15 by Thomas Pornin
2
votes
The Poodle attack model is one where the attacker triggers the requests (normally with some Javascript in the client -- note that, in that case, requests will be GET, not POST, since that "evil Javasc …
answered Oct 17 '14 by Thomas Pornin
12
votes
Switches are NOT a security feature. That's the important part. A switch is an optimization over a hub, meant for better performance, not for security. When a hub receives a packet (an ethernet fram …
answered Nov 7 '11 by Thomas Pornin
3
votes
The RSA "export" cipher suites can work a bit like ephemeral Diffie-Hellman: if the server's "permanent" key is longer than 512 bits, then the server is supposed to generate a new one (dynamically) of …
answered Mar 9 '15 by Thomas Pornin
12
votes
Insecure but widely used cryptographic algorithms include: hash functions: MD4, MD5, (SHA-1) (MD2 is also insecure but not widely used; SHA-1 is only "weakened"; MD4 and MD5 are also widely used in …
answered Apr 28 '11 by Thomas Pornin
5
votes
ECC RAM is not necessarily immune; ECC memory reliably fix one-bit flips and detect most two-bit flips, which makes the attack harder, but not conceptually infeasible. Non-ECC RAM is not necessarily …
answered Mar 10 '15 by Thomas Pornin
11
votes
An algorithm can be secure only if used properly within a protocol that matches what the algorithm was meant to do. So none of the algorithms you list can be deemed "secure" in an absolute, unconditio …
answered Sep 2 '15 by Thomas Pornin
10
votes
VGA and HDMI are not one-way; besides the main send-pictures functionality, there is some low-bandwidth bidirectional communication. This is how a computer can "know" that a new display was connected, …
answered Aug 21 '12 by Thomas Pornin
3
votes
I give you exhibit A, a PC with an installed Windows operating system, and a configured user account, and some data which has been "protected" with DPAPI on behalf of the user. Then exhibit B, the us …
answered Feb 3 '13 by Thomas Pornin
34
votes
Apple apparently takes this seriously, since they "disabled Java" in users' computers, which is a rather drastic move. This actually smells like a pretext to kill off the technology, as part of a wide …
answered Jan 12 '13 by Thomas Pornin
15
votes
The problem is not in doing a renegotiation; it is in believing in security characteristics that the renegotiation does not provide. Renegotiation is making a new handshake while in the middle of a S …
answered Nov 27 '12 by Thomas Pornin
7
votes
If the attacker gets to choose the files he can overwrite, then he just has to replace a few operating system files to completely own the machine (e.g. replace the kernel and wait for the next reboot) …
answered Aug 24 '12 by Thomas Pornin
27
votes
Canaries and other volatiles do not prevent the overflow; they just try to cope with the consequences of an overflow which has happened. The canary tries to detect the case of an overflow which overwr …
answered Sep 21 '12 by Thomas Pornin
0
votes
It is conceptually feasible to have a SSL implementation which is free of buffer overflows: it suffices to use a programming language which forcibly prevents buffer overflows. For instance, an SSL imp …
answered Jan 5 '13 by Thomas Pornin

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