Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
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Encryption is the process of transforming plaintext using a cipher to make it unreadable to anyone except those possessing the key.

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The two obvious options are - Client side encryption with an exportable key. The key can be backed up at creation somewhere the owner views as secure. Alternatively it can be encrypted with a user … provided password and uploaded to the service - providing this additional password on client install allows additional devices to decrypt the key. Client side encryption with a key derived from a …
answered Jan 14 '18 by Hector
6
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) can be read. The easy option for a false base-station is force your phone to 2G which isn't encrypted. 3G encryption has multiple known weaknesses. 4G encryption should be OK. But its only from the …
answered Oct 25 '17 by Hector
3
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. That being said, RIPEMD-160 is still available for system encryption since it is the only alternative available to SHA-256, and you can still For non-system encryption, Whirlpool is a strong …
answered Dec 15 '17 by Hector
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I believe modern android versions support "fast encryption". To quote the documentation - fast encryption, which only encrypts used blocks on the data partition to avoid first boot taking a long … time. Only ext4 and f2fs filesystems currently support fast encryption. This to me suggests it will not overwrite currently unused storage. If you are concerned I would suggest filling the disk as …
answered Oct 18 '17 by Hector
5
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3answers
Ordinarily I'd use PBKDF2 to generate a key which i'd use with AES. But seeing as the hash is going to be as long as the data I need to encrypt is there any disadvantage to just XOR'ing it? My reason …
asked May 14 '15 by Hector
1
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Initially I thought that I could just enter the keys manually on application startup and keep them stored in memory, but the problem with that is then I would need to manually intervene to start up …
answered Dec 20 '17 by Hector
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0answers
Attempting to recover lost admin passwords from an old industrial control system database. We believe these have been encrypted rather than hashed (at least we know password version 0 for this system …
asked Jul 29 by Hector
26
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The author seems to use "simple" and "naïve" interchangeably. Yes it seems he is referring to the act of signing (with the senders private key) and encrypting (with the receivers public key) the plain …
answered Dec 18 '17 by Hector
2
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One option is to generate the users key from their password at login (or store randomly generated keys encrypted with it). This is then stored in memory while they are logged in and wiped from memory …
answered Nov 13 '17 by Hector
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You always need a secure way to distribute public keys. I believe the paper assumes you are able to do this. However having that mechanism does not mean you can trust any single entity. You might tru …
answered Dec 19 '17 by Hector
-1
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unsupported encryption program with known flaws with an unsupported operating system. At the very least look at VeraCrypt - which is a fork of the TrueCrypt codebase which has fixed known flaws and offers several improvements. …
answered Jan 22 '18 by Hector
36
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Schroeder is almost certainly right in that its just a marketing way of saying they restrict bandwidth to certain sites IP addresses or look for priority markers on the packets. It is worth noting ho …
answered Oct 26 '17 by Hector
0
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iOS and Android are so owned by intelligence services that endpoint security on all supported platforms is a joke Older versions sure. Up to date systems? Do you have any evidence of routine acce …
answered Oct 10 '17 by Hector
1
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this data (client or server), where you will store the keys for the encryption and whether you will encrypt communication with the server. What is the communication system between the client and …
answered Oct 19 '17 by Hector
3
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There is not a known answer to this. There are algorithms that are viewed as secure and algorithms that aren't - "secure" algorithms may contain flaws but to date they are not publicly known. Schneier …
answered Oct 4 '17 by Hector