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18

For HTTP, you rely on nobody being able to spy on your packets (or alter/drop/duplicate them) between your device (your smartphone or computer) and the target server. 2G and 3G offer some encryption, but only from your device to the nearest base station; encryption is "over the air". From the base station to the target server, there is no encryption (or, at ...


11

If HTTPS is being used, regardless of what the carrier network is, the functionality is the same. So, even if someone can actually sniff data that you send over 3G, they would have to do the same amount of work they would have to do to decrypt it when they get the encrypted data on an ethernet cable. This currently cannot be done. Hence, to answer your ...


4

Is there some form of encryption built into it? Yes, 3G has encryption. It usually is strong enough for attacks based on observation alone. is that secured or easily hackable? Sigh. Could we move away from using words like "hackable" or "I've been hacked" in general? They're super non-descriptive. If "hacking" means cracking the cipher used to encrypt ...


4

Without going into deep detail about how Internet Protocol routing and the Domain Name System work, it's actually quite easy for your ISP (and in this case, your provider is your ISP) to know what domains you visit. To answer your question, the provider maintains a list of all the IP addresses registered to Facebook. When your phone requests Internet data ...


3

You have the other comments already. As a minor point, the list isn't quite correct in two areas: A5/4 isn't Snow 3G - it is a full length 128-bit key version of A5/3 using the Kasumi algorithm. See 3GPP TS 55.226. The Kasumi algorithm applied to GSM uses a 64 bit key bulked out to 128 bits for algorithm input. A5/4 extended that to using the full 128 ...


3

The HTTP or HTTPS protocol will be just as secure over 3G as with any other type of network (WiFi, wired, etc). As ewanm89 points out, the 3G portion of the connection is only between your device and the phone network. Packets will still be sent between the phone network and the remaining servers along the path to the server you are trying to reach. If ...


2

But my provider has a promotion where facebook and twitter traffic is free, so I can use facebook and twitter and not use up my 1 gb of data. These are negotiated deals where Facebook and Twitter will provide the wireless provider with a list of IP addresses that will be used to provide data to their clients. FB and Twitter are usually required to give at ...


2

Yes, acceptance of a specific crypto suite is up to the SIM/USIM application on the UICC smart card that is colloquially called "SIM card" these days. Note, however, that categorically disabling weaker ciphers might inhibit roaming. Also note that carriers do usually stand under the influence of law enforcement - there might be very subtle political reasons ...


1

In a word, Yes All connections you make to the internet are through an ISP who most likly has a record of the device you connected from and what servers you connected too.


1

First of all, from your own linked article - While this flaw doesn’t reportedly allow attackers to intercept calls or messages, it does enable them to monitor consumption patterns and track the phone location. I.e. they can't see what you are sending or to who. But with several monitoring devices they could triangulate your phone location and know when ...


1

IMSI is just a single method in which a MITM attack could take place. Most of the time a IMSI catcher is fairly passive in that it wants to see RX/TX data and proxy it to the proper tower for full functionality as to make sure the user has no clue. However, it can also be used as a DOS tool as well where it can become more of an active attack tool if need be....


1

First thing, first: You'll want to invest in yet another Ethernet NIC adapter for your fancy Intel motherboard in which to replace your onboard Ethernet device with. Most Ethernet NIC do not have IME. This takes care of your biggest security fear, as long as you do not plug anything to that onboard Ethernet port.


1

Without the USIM application running on your UICC (the smartcard colloquially known as "SIM"), there's no crypto provider, so yes, I think the network and phone must then agree on unencrypted transmission. So, first of all: whether emergency calls without a SIM are possible or not is up to local legislation. They work in many countries, but not all. Also ...


1

I'm going to copy a comment of OP's into this answer, because it's relevant to understanding the context in which this question was asked: The question was just a hypothetical to see if 3G was secure. – frenchie 2016-12-04 17:54:31Z This shows a flawed understanding of what "security" is and means. "Secure" isn't a binary property of a technology. It ...


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