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AppArmor profile for this case is: profile nonetwork /path/to/exec { # Allow all rules... capability, network, mount, remount, umount, pivot_root, ptrace, signal, dbus, unix, file, # ...but no network deny network, deny capability net_admin, deny capability net_bind_service, deny capability net_broadcast, deny capability ...


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This sounds like you are looking for the scope property of oAuth 2. with scope you can ask for different level of access and to different type of access. You could even use scoping to limit access to specific Datacenters, just use a named scope per Datacenter. The oAuth 2 provider can even inform the client about the given scopes, going beyond the scopes ...


2

While role-based access control (RBAC) is a major model for managing the authorizations, implementing RBAC has some limitations and consequences. One of the consequences is role explosion, where multiple versions (duplicates) of one role are required to separately manage access to distinct sets of data of the same class. Role-Centric Attribute-Based Access ...


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Blocking a port is cheap: it can be done by a simple stateless firewall only inspecting up to OSI layer 4. It can also be done with the first packet already, i.e. even at the TCP handshake were no data are transferred yet. Blocking by the actually spoken application protocol needs to analyze the payload (layer 7). This means that first it needs to collect ...


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You have a system, X, where you want a user A to access X and never access it again. You can't know who A is, and A belongs to the set E with Everyone. Even if you have the user act as a trustworthy user who will only attempt using their current system, as soon as they interact with your system they are no longer anonymous, as they belong to the previously ...


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There is no such model and no such problem. As long as users are not authenticated you cannot prevent multiple usage of your resources by the same user. Users can delete cookies, can change their IP, can change their browser, etc. If you require users to be authenticated then you can reduce the number of such cases, because some part of users can find it to ...


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I think I understood what the risks are, but I failed to see how someone could achieve this. Is it possible to change JWT data after it is generated? Or am I missing the point here? JWT was made in such a way to prevent what you are saying(token signing).Infact if you use an updated JWT library you can prevent token tampering.Most of JWT related ...


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