New answers tagged

0

We cannot know the answers. It depends completely on your use case, of which you have explained very little. Some considerations: How many data key do you need to create? As many as you have different access permissions. For example: if group1 has access to col1, col2, col3 and group2 has access to col1,col4,col5 you would need 3 data keys (one for col1, ...


1

This depends on the block cipher mode that's used and/or any message authentication that the system may do. But plain old encryption-only modes likes AES-CBC and AES-CTR are vulnerable to malleability attacks, where an attacker who can get some ciphertext (or even better, ciphertext/plaintext pairs) is able to modify it to produce a message some aspects of ...


0

OpenSSL & GPG have different implementations of same algorithms, so with current versions, aren't compatible eg. different magic bits (until someone comes up with an intermediate software that translates between the two eg. translator or virtual machine). This issue arises in every new technology/industry (cf. NTSC & PAL, MacOS & Windows, Diesel ...


1

As others have mentioned, you already have TLS, so this won't add any security, it'll just slow things down. You mention sharing a private key between servers. Don't do that. Ever. Generate individual key pairs for every server, and have your central server sign them (the usual certificate generation process, with your central server as the CA). The method ...


0

JSON Web Encryption RFC 7516 is an IETF standard that can do what you are looking for, it can handle AES in addition to other crypto algorithms. JSON Web Encryption (JWE) represents encrypted content using JSON- based data structures [RFC7159]. The JWE cryptographic mechanisms encrypt and provide integrity protection for an arbitrary sequence of octets. ...


Top 50 recent answers are included