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3

AES-CBC only insures confidentiality, not integrity or authenticity. If you look at the image down below, you can see how the Cipher Block Chaining Mode works for AES: Source: Wikimedia Commons For now, let's ignore all the other blocks of data, padding, etc., and just focus on the first block of data. The ciphertext is decrypted with the key, and then ...


2

Is safe to use AES-256 to encrypt data with small variations? In principle, yes. In fact, the construction used in CTR mode depends on this being secure -- it encrypts a series of sequential values to generate pseudorandom data. In practice, there is a usability issue with the protocol you are describing. If a message is lost or corrupted in transit, the ...


-1

I'd suggest AES-256 CBC. Even if a predictable counter is used, it would be non breakable. Each time you would generate a new IV. But you say you don't want to use random part. If you agree to generate IV, then AES-256 CBC can be a good solution.


2

I introduce you to Kerckhoffs's principle. A system is only safe if it is safe even if everything is known about the system (except the encryption keys). If an attacker can see the traffic, knows how you issue commands, and knows that you added a counter, then yes, an attack can issue commands. An attack can simply recreate the commands and guess at the ...


-2

Briefly: Yes, it is secure. Detailed: The purpose of encryption is to protect data if somebody obtained access to them. We expect that somebody will try to get such access. It may look counter intuitive, but the probability of decryption of encrypted data is the same, not matter if you keep encrypted data locally or in some public place. Either you trust ...


0

First of all, GPG has its own message format. Unless this is what is produced you won't be able to use it for decryption. Openssl should be the better option for you. According to the documentation link you provided, the encryption is done using the AES cipher in CBC mode with PKCS#5 padding (all of those are important, AES128 is not a full encryption ...


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