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You're asking what is the number n of survey respondents such that n is higher than the threshold for anonymity. I feel like this is putting the cart before the horse. To answer questions about how many responses you would need for it to be anonymous requires knowledge of the population, which is the entire point of a survey. That leads us to... A concept ...


3

Let's examine your risk factors step by step: I use a laptop running Tails/Tor This is a solid anonymization between you and the end user. Provided of course you don't overtly supply identifying information. set up a new email account on protonmail ProtonMail requires an alternate Email, SMS, or Donation to get past their anti-spam human check (At least ...


3

Nothing. The phone simply has an option to not your send caller ID (i.e. your phone number) to the person you are calling. Nothing too special about it. In fact a lot of telephone network providers already provide a way to do this, so you don't need a special phone for it. Note that this will not prevent law enforcement from tracing your calls if they want ...


3

The appropriate privacy level is entirely context dependent. Clearly k=1 and k=n are generally useless (for a data set of size n). One provides no anonymity, the other does not retain any utility (other than about very basic info like the size of the data set). But there could be interesting values in between. In this anonymity vs utility tradeoff, an ...


3

With Ring 0 (kernel) malware anonymity can be preserved You just need to make sure you are under control of Ring -1 before you get infected by using a Type 1 hypervisor (one that runs underneath the operating system's kernel), and that the Virtual Machine that receives the attack is completely isolated from anything that can leak any identifying information. ...


3

How it creates the private channel on the internet It creates a connection between the VPN entry (usually directly on the client) and the VPN exit and then encapsulates all traffic into this connection. Imagine a train which transports passengers between two stations instead of the passengers walking this way by themselves. The "private" comes ...


3

It depends on what kind of privacy you are talking about. If it's about the carrier/government knowing all places you go, when you are moving, when you are not, where you live, whom you call, whom you text, who calls you, it does not change much: triangulation will show your coarse position on a modern smartphone and a dumb cellphone the same way, and the ...


3

I constantly read about the weaknesses of popular "secure" messaging applications such as Signal, Telegram, and WhatsApp. These are all commercial products. They exist to generate income for the people who develop and maintain these services. An element of privacy/secrecy exists to facilitate this. But the financial requirement undermines the ...


3

I wonder whether using a relay server in the middle doesn't actually add a layer of privacy since it would be less obvious where the packets are being sent - all packets would go to the server instead of being sent straight to the other device. It adds different kinds of privacy. You have (mainly) two kinds of privacy here: Privacy from provider Privacy ...


2

Criminals seeking to perpetrate fraud over the telephone have been known to use TTY services (which are intended to help deaf people communicate by phone) to disguise their voice. See https://www.npr.org/2005/08/14/4799617/phone-service-for-deaf-a-target-for-abuse.


2

There is no and it is likely there will be no in any observable future. Services need and have to be self-sustainable. For even a decentralised messenger using user's devices instead of rented servers following still has to be paid: salary for good developers. Otherwise almost noone will develop the software, and the development will be very slow, tech debt ...


2

Deep Packet Inspection (DPI) is straight forward to do and is all or nothing capable, but sometimes only a subset is inspected for load reasons. However that is an inspection of the frame packets, it does not include a Man in The Middle (MiTM) capability to decrypt the packet contents, the payload is still encrypted. Traffic Analysis looks at patterns, ...


2

I found this question interesting. I will try to answer to each question assuming that I consider DPI, in this case, equivalent to SSL/TLS Man in The Middle. The DPI which only observe some clues in the cleartext parts of a frame (like in the paper you mentioned) are not able to recover the encrypted parts. This way could permit to block some Tor nodes but ...


2

If you really have sensitive information to transmit, seems to me that learning PGP is a must-do. when Edward Snowden contacted journalists he actually had to train them to PGP in order to establish a secure channel for further correspondence. I am talking about end to end encryption here, not relying on some third party like Protonmail to encrypt your ...


2

You can't. Someone has to know your address, because someone needs to be able to reach you. You're essentially just putting ever more proxies between you and the server you effectively want to communicate. Direct Using a Using multiple Connection VPN Gateway VPN Gateways +---------------+ +--------...


2

You should look into TOR browser if you're looking to browse the web for the most part anonymously. It's a little more beginner friendly than tails. To answer your question directly, yes, the easiest way to verify you are accessing the web via a TOR exit node is to go to google or DuckDuckGo and type 'whats is my IP' before then after you connect through TOR ...


1

Likely That depends all on what scripts the page might be running. If the page contains malicious code that is trying to de-anonymize you, then it is a risk. If the page has <script src="//example.gov/trackUser.js"></script> this is what happens using the Tor Browser: The script is downloaded via Tor, so your IP is not revealed to the ...


1

Yes it is the intended behaviour. Because you are misunderstanding what ssh is made for: ssh allows to open a remote shell session. That means that is a site allows you to connect with ssh, you are allowed to execute any command there, and the only remaining security is the file system permissions. Said differently there is a very high trust between the ...


1

Fingerprinting is a cat and mouse game. Trackers are always finding new undocumented features that respond differently on each system, and browser makers always closing them as soon as they can. That's the "quickly becoming obsolete" part. That means it does not work anymore? Not at all. It's that older fingerprinting tricks (those ancient ones ...


1

What solutions exist for hiding (e.g. disguising, obscuring) this information from an untrusted VPN server? Yes, don't use an untrusted VPN server. If your VPN server is untrusted, no cleartext protocol is safe when you route traffic to it. Plain HTTP traffic can be sniffed, altered, and injected with ads or malware. DNS requests can point to another server....


1

When generating Tor traffic is suspicious then the best way to hide is to not use Tor. What is your end goal and who is your adversary? You only really need Tor when you want to connect to a hidden service. For normal websites you could just use a VPN/proxy or multiple of those. For VPN + Tor creating lots of (non tor) traffic will make analysis at least ...


1

What you expect can be done, but will not be convenient. It's not needed to create a new fingerprint for every connection, but have one fingerprint that are so generic it cannot be linked to you. You can buy a popular phone - a cheap Samsung (for example) running the stock ROM (not rooted), and access the site using your provider. For the next access, ...


1

Correct, you just internet search for "what is my ip". You are looking to see if that number is different than your expected home IP address. To get your home IP address, you might check on another computer (or smartphone on wifi) that isn't running Tor, to see what your own IP address is and compare. You might also choose to use a geoip database ...


1

You should read this blog - https://blog.bolehvpn.net/tor-over-vpn-vpn-over-tor-which-is-better/ it suggests connecting to TOR through a VPN to generally offer higher security, while connecting to a VPN through TOR generally provides better anonymity. While both have their own advantages and disadvantages, you would still need to trust your VPN provider as ...


1

The fact that a file was downloaded with TOR doesn't really have much relevance to whether or not it's technically safe to open, except maybe that it might be "more likely" to be malware. If you're asking if opening the file will compromise your anonymity, then that depends on the filetype and your setup. Generally you can assume that unless you're ...


1

Ideally, you would have example.com provide a protocol to authenticate the users (such as OAuth2, as suggested above). Or simply a "registration password" that is available at some example.com intranet. Lacking that ability, you would probably want some kind of blind signature. Ideally through a third party. Probably that could use a system similar ...


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