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36

Your data is probably* safe if the following three criteria are met: You have FileVault turned on (full disk encryption). Your laptop requires a password on boot and every time you open the lid (auto screen lock). Your password is not well known (easy to guess). TL;DR; If you don't have FileVault turned on, then your data is in plaintext and anyone can ...


20

I unlocked a Mac laptop that a friend "found in a bin" without knowing the password and accessed all data on it. After a quick bit of googling I created a new account and reset the existing account password. We worked out who owned the laptop previously, called her, and to my utter surprise, she said she threw it in the bin. It was an older laptop and about ...


4

If you make use of Apple's iMessage service then you are implicitly trusting Apple, as they wrote all the code that you are running and therefore could make it do anything they want it to. So either you believe their statements, in which case iMessages are encrypted end-to-end and all is well, or you don't trust them and you should probably not use iMessage....


4

Your base assumption is correct, your VPN provider is very literally a MitM and can use that position to conduct all the questionable snooping and tampering an attacker can normally do. As you said, if you are making a connection over HTTP the VPN provider could easily sniff all of your traffic and data and based on their privacy policy, most likely are. ...


4

First off - why would anyone consider this a security risk? Apple's implementation of the WiFi password sharing feature is much better implemented than Microsoft's attempt from a while ago. For starters: You can only share the password knowingly, and with someone you trust: You still receive a notification when your friend wants to connect to your network ...


3

Telegram uses the Firebase Cloud Messaging system for its push notifications on Android, and APNS (Apple's equivalent) on iOS devices. These notifications to the Telegram app on your phone come from the Google and Apple servers, respectively. Telegram -> Push Service (Google/Apple/etc) -> phone -> app -> notification So yes, the traffic is not ...


3

It is possible to open the keychain file provided that you have the password associated with it (usually, but not always the user's login password). I have personally done this when backing up and performing a manual upgrade of my personal system, although I do not know where any software is available to open the file out of Mac OS.


3

The best strategy depends on what your constraints and goals are. A quick answer... Perhaps an alternative is to powerbutton-off the laptop and then bootup a USB Linux which does not "touch" the RAM All bootable systems will touch memory. Lighter systems touch less, but still some. However, the memory will be scrambled with a (weak) LFSR ...


3

Your concern is perfectly valid in theory. I am not an expert in fingerprint recreation, but a I've read quite a few articles where people have successfully hacked in devices using the fingerprint sensor via one of the following methods - A high resolution picture of a finger. Link - https://gizmodo.com/chaos-computer-club-says-they-can-hack-your-...


3

It's going to be impossible to tell what can be extracted from a non-functioning device without inspecting it. It is impossible for us to know what has malfunctioned or how or if storage is accessible or damaged. So, yes, there is a possibility that someone could extract any amount of data. If you want to be on the safe side, and you cannot factory reset (...


3

There is no evidence that Apple has ever installed a hardware keylogger into any of their products. I can find no reference to such a feature or option existing or being advertised, either for consumer or commercial purposes. Further, it seems highly unlikely that a hardware vendor would embark on such an ethically questionable course of action against their ...


2

Worst case. Strictly speaking, a machine where someone got to run something you don't know - whatever it actually did - is to be treated as "compromised", i.e., all accounts on it have to have their password changed, the data saved to backup before reformatting the machine, reinstalling the OS and restoring the documents - if you're really paranoid, the ...


2

Sounds like your keyboard is trying to establish an unencrypted connection. This allows any attacker (with physical proximity) to sniff the connection with the keyboard and logging the keys, thus enabling him to steal passwords and login information. An attacker could also hijack the connection and start controlling the computer as if he had the keyboard ...


2

The dummy, i.e. unconnected, microphone plug was a commonly recommended security method many years ago. It worked by mechanically breaking the circuit to the internal microphone in order to connect to the non-existent external microphone. Those days are long past, despite this now misguided security recommendation. Nearly all modern devices use software ...


1

You can easily build yourself a "mic lock" by getting the cheapest wired microphone solution that will work for your hardware (for example a Bluetooth dongle with a microphone that goes in. The cheaper the better, since cheaper means it won't have things like multiple microphones or Noise Cancellation microphones or things like that. Also, cheapo ...


1

@schroeder is correct in the way that the infrastructure works, it's considered "secure". However, there is another vector, and anybody who is coming here to learn about security should be made aware of this: notifications for newly received telegram The encryption ends at the application. One the mobile device itself, the content is clearly ...


1

Factory reset, open the camera and let it record a movie in the highest resolution and framerate until all storage is full, factory reset again. The first factory reset will free all storage, then the movie recording will fill up all the storage, overwriting everything, and the second factory reset deletes everything again. This will work even on older ...


1

There's always possibility... Nevertheless, why would they continue tracking and monitoring you using this tools since they can put any backdoor they want as editor of the operating system ? It would be far easier to do this directly on the OS shipped with your device. Moreover, such a monitoring would probably be discovered and lead to a scandal...


1

The most basic review is stuff already provided by Apple, such as "what permissions does the app request" and "who published it". You can also instruct the OS to not give the app some of the permissions it may want. All apps published through the store are digitally signed, so you can be sure that the version you install is the one that was uploaded to Apple....


1

Don't trust random devices to be secure. Instead, implement a firewall between 'the internet' and your device, and make sure to block this unrequired traffic at the firewall level. Apple have discontinued the product, and according to at least one chat thread there isn't a firmware upgrade to disable this, nor will one be forth coming. As a slight aside, ...


1

The Stack Exchange network is only accessible over HTTPS. If you try to access it over HTTP, you'll just get a redirect: % curl --include http://stackoverflow.com/ HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently Content-Type: text/html; charset=utf-8 Location: https://stackoverflow.com/ […] Additionally, Apple has measures in place to incentivize apps to use HTTPS. Apps ...


1

You can change your path order in /etc/paths to prevent such malicious behaviour. However $PATH could be overrided in shell script (like .bash_profile or .zshrc) so check/change them too. Regarding Macports - I prefer to run untrusted software in a userspace with minimal privileges, so Homebrew is more suitable. Regarding Unix shell - just build a chain of ...


1

This would be practically impossible. Off course, you could open it up and see if there's any strange looking components who doesn't seem to belong there. But how would one tell what's legitimate and what's not? Plus, the keylogger could be in the firmware, meaning it's not hardware and can't be seen directly. That it's a Bluetooth keyboard makes the ...


1

From my understanding iOS 11 doesn't delete the keychain keys for an app when you delete the app, I'm talking about the keychain on the device so cloud settings won't affect this. No other apps can access another app's keychain so you don't need to worry about it from a security point of view but it's entirely possible the app is using the keychain store to ...


1

Apple addresses this question in their iCloud Security Overview support page. Pulling the relevant quotes from this article they claim that end to end encrypted services can only be accessed by the user. For certain sensitive information, Apple uses end-to-end encryption. This means that only you can access your information, and only on devices where you’...


1

You seem to have one of the more common misconceptions about end to end encrypted messengers. The end to end encryption is used for messages in transit from Alice to Bob, once they've reached Bob's device they're generally stored unencrypted (albeit usually with encryption at the system level). Encryption of stored messages and backups is a separate feature. ...


1

Is my assumption for vpn working is correct ? - yes How do i know in iPhone if the VPN client has installed cert or not ? - if your iphone is not jailbroken, all certs have to be installed by you manually. Some more explanations: For HTTP - provider will see everything For HTTPS - provider got 2 ways: Install cert to MITM you Use some HTTPS inspection / ...


1

Encryption makes no sense in this context. Writing an encrypted version of the data to the media will make it strictly easier to recover the data than simply writing random data. However since you are asking about an SSD there is an even better option. Use a tool to issue a TRIM command (or a sequence of commands) to the drive instructing it to delete all ...


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