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a) You don't encrypt a message with your public/private key. If you use public Key cryptographer you generate a key encrypt the message with a symmetric cipher with that key and only encrypt the key with the asymmetric key. b) The signature here is a hash of the message which is encrypted with your private key. In both cases the recipient can detect if the ...


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The question as you ask it isn't really matter of one being globally better or worse than the other. These are two tools that perform different tasks. Encryption - A message encrypted with someone's public key, can only be decrypted by someone in possession of the matching Private key. Who was the message really from? No promises there! Signing - When ...


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These misconceptions come from people trying to explain digital signatures to the layperson. Once someone understands the concept of asymmetric encryption, a common way to explain signatures is "encryption with private key", but in reality there is no such thing (for a very technical explanation, see here). You're far better off thinking of asymmetric ...


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If you don't have prior knowledge of the keys, and no secure channel or other means for verifying keys, then it of course breaks down in the face of an attacker who can modify messages. But. We have certificate authorities on the internet that we trust. We trust that they only issue a key for the domain example.org to the entity that can demonstrate control ...


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