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When we look at basic definitions of the terms threat and attack, we assume that there are two different entities while most don't realize that one could very easily be the cause for the other. Meaning, a threat exists and hence an attack would be possible. So when you talk about a threat, you are automatically talking about all the possible attacks that the ...


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Removing the process should be pretty easy: change the security on the EXE to deny the Execute permission (this can be done on a file with running processes), and then run taskkill /f /im Wslxrqjet.exe to terminate all instances of the running process as simultaneously as possible. New instances won't be able to start (unless something reset the permissions ...


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With GNU/Linux, this should be possible simply by mounting the / file system read-only and adding tmpfs file systems (that saves the data on RAM) for /var/log etc. that needs to be writable. There are some caveats with this approach, though: Any process with root privileges might mount the file system as read/write. An optical medium solves this, as it's ...


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Create the URL using the JavaScript URL API. dest = new URL("Default.aspx", window.location); dest.searchParams.append("uId", selecteduserId); window.location = dest.href; This provides a higher-level API, and it correctly encodes everything for you.


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Yes, a server can handle a lot of requests, but it is not handling just the attacker's requests. It is handling it's normal load, and these attacks are on top of that load. It certainly is possible for a single attacker to exhaust remaining server resources, which means that this type of attack is correctly described as a non-DDoS attack. Yes, it might be ...


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Yes it can, in fact basically that type of attack tries to consume the internal memory that is handling the buffering of the post operation. In general the backends have parameters for handle this type of situations.


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