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2

Credit cards are stochastically secure (like all banking). They aren't trying to make the system unbreakable, they are trying to make the fraud losses be a suitably low percentage of the margin. (And optimise for cost and convenience - if you had to visit a branch and show three forms of ID, as well as their needing many expensive branch clerks, a lot of ...


25

A lot of people get a credit card and leave it in the envelope for a considerable amount of time. Further, separating the data complicates life very greatly for a mail thief. To snatch one piece of mail is a crime of opportunity. But to snatch two on separate days requires veritable stalking. Having gotten one piece, the thief must now return to the ...


101

Many low level crimes are ones of opportunity, not planned out attacks. By separating the two needed pieces of mail in time, it forces the attacker to intercept the same person's mail more than once. This prevents a mail thief from simply walking up to homes and looking for credit cards and activating them all in one step. Now suddenly the thief has to ...


3

Username and password alone or together with WebAuthn1 only offer an authentication of the user. Modern authentication methods used by the banks like PhotoTAN instead authenticate each transaction separately: not only it gets checked that the user is present but the transaction information are displayed on an independent system (app on mobile phone or ...


0

I think other answers explain well risks of giving your password to PayPal. I think the bigger issue here is that users are taught in this way that they can sometimes provide password to somebody. This is IMO extremely bad and stupid and I'm highly disappointed by PayPal for doing so.


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