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Because those with the programming knowledge have a considerable edge over those without: Reverse engineering malware Understanding vulnerabilities in code Creating custom tools Writing custom exploits, etc. Using automated tools is great, but unless you understand how those automated tools function, you'll never be able to level up. But, you don't need ...


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Is programming knowledge mandatory for an Information Security job? No, it's not. You can certainly become a pentester or a security architect by focusing your studies on these fields, with only minimal or no programming knowledge. Does programming knowledge help? Yes, it does. Because programming in turn teaches a lot about how computers work, and more ...


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It is useful for a security person to be able to make its own scripts. Advanced programming should not be required because programming is software designer's job, not security person's job. If you impose a mix of the 2 as an employer you are making a big mistake because that person will spend insufficient time dealing with security. So a scrip and a small ...


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i and len would often be registers, and therefore unaffected by your memory copying. If they are in fact being loaded from (and stored to, in i's case) on every iteration, though, you just need to set the correct bytes in your input buffer such that the value that gets written to i is the one that should be written. Assuming you're on x86 or another little-...


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EDIT: There is a bug in the code. for (i = 0; i <= len; i++) { buf[i] = arg[i]; } The variable arg is not defined, not sure how this would even compile. It should probably be input. Try the following; ./a.out $(python -c "print 'A'*272") I have not tried this myself, but it should overflow the return address on the stack. Since the ...


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