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288 votes
Accepted

How do mobile carriers know video resolution over HTTPS connections?

This is an active area of research. I happen to have done some work in this area, so I'll share what I can about the basic idea (this work was with industry partners and I can't share the secret ...
ff524's user avatar
  • 1,986
75 votes

Does Lawful Interception of 4G / the proposed 5G provide a back door for hackers as well?

Without access to the key, then the problem for attackers is the same as if there was no backdoor key: the attackers would have to break the encryption itself. But ... If we assume that the ...
schroeder's user avatar
  • 131k
65 votes

Is a 'dumbphone' mobile more secure for basic phone calls than a smartphone?

Has the security of the basic phone call changed much, in the last 10 years ? So, do smartphones utilise anything new [purely in] the initiation and connection of just the phone call itself ? Yes. ...
Hacktiker's user avatar
  • 934
48 votes

How do mobile carriers know video resolution over HTTPS connections?

Nothing maxes out bandwidth at a consistent rate other than streaming video. Also, in order to make sure that stream is handled with priority (and not like a big file download, for instance) ...
schroeder's user avatar
  • 131k
35 votes

How do mobile carriers know video resolution over HTTPS connections?

Schroeder is almost certainly right in that its just a marketing way of saying they restrict bandwidth to certain sites IP addresses or look for priority markers on the packets. It is worth noting ...
Hector's user avatar
  • 11k
27 votes

Does Lawful Interception of 4G / the proposed 5G provide a back door for hackers as well?

While I agree that every point of schroeder's response is true, there are two deeper issues that make it so much more dangerous than the current model of security. Right now, if you install an ...
Nosajimiki's user avatar
  • 1,857
23 votes

Is a 'dumbphone' mobile more secure for basic phone calls than a smartphone?

Case in point: Snowden uses a feature phone (i.e. 'dumb phone). A few people would like to attack his phone, but even if they succeed, it's a very limited reward. OpenMOKO is an example of such a ...
user400344's user avatar
17 votes

Does Lawful Interception of 4G / the proposed 5G provide a back door for hackers as well?

If there's a backdoor, it will be abused. The question is when, not if it will be abused. There are too many actors that could compromise such a system, and no easy way to plug the holes. If a ...
ThoriumBR's user avatar
  • 54.5k
12 votes

How do mobile carriers know video resolution over HTTPS connections?

If you use a (proper) VPN that values security/privacy over performance, it will employ a bunch of tricks to befuddle any attempts by your ISP to positively identify you as streaming video: The ISP ...
allquixotic's user avatar
11 votes
Accepted

Did I stumble upon a cell hidden network or is my device being attacked?

I strongly suspect those four characters are an "A", a "T", an "&" (the Sun symbol) and a "T" again. Possibly the UTF8 for 4F10, 5418, E298BC and 5418. Actually, as @Matt observed, the little-...
LSerni's user avatar
  • 22.9k
11 votes

How do mobile carriers know video resolution over HTTPS connections?

The biggest thing is the address you connect to. HTTPS protects the data in flight, but doesn't protect the address you are talking to. If Verizon knows the IP addresses of the Netflix servers, they ...
AJ Henderson's user avatar
  • 42.1k
11 votes

Is a 'dumbphone' mobile more secure for basic phone calls than a smartphone?

Sure, Internet connection and physical data intefaces like USB or microSD constitute attack vectors. However, if you use your smartphone as a dumbphone (i.e. never enable data connections, never plug ...
Dmitry Grigoryev's user avatar
6 votes

How SS7 attack first enter into SS7 network?

SS7 attacks can't be done via ISDN lines. In order to attack the SS7 network, the attacker has to be "on the SS7" network. The SS7 network connects telco companies together, but it is not extended to ...
user2716262's user avatar
5 votes

Is a 'dumbphone' mobile more secure for basic phone calls than a smartphone?

I think you might be conflating two different things when you say "more secure". On the one hand, I'm sure that the old proprietary operating systems of 'dumb phones' could easily be hacked if the ...
Blackhawk's user avatar
  • 211
4 votes

Is a 'dumbphone' mobile more secure for basic phone calls than a smartphone?

It can mitigate some risks but expose you to some other ones. You see, in most smartphones (but not all), the cellular network interface is separate from the main CPU and only talks to it through a ...
André Borie's user avatar
  • 12.8k
4 votes

How does mobile free internet bypass works? (UBT / FBT)

(See edit below for solution) I've been trying to figure this out myself, because I'm incredulous that this actually works. As far as I can tell from the guides I've seen (I haven't used it myself), ...
Stavros Korokithakis's user avatar
4 votes

Is it possible to track a SIM card even if the cell phone is turned off?

No. A SIM card only provides the device with a unique identifier and related information. It does not have any in-built wireless capabilities. In order for a mobile device to be tracked, it needs to ...
forest's user avatar
  • 66.9k
4 votes
Accepted

Security of WWAN cards in laptops

Modern, complicated PCIe device run large firmware that can, and has, been found to contain vulnerabilities that allow remote exploitation. A vulnerability on the card could allow a remote attacker to ...
forest's user avatar
  • 66.9k
4 votes

What happens if incorrect SIM card PUK entered 10 times?

On a modern phone, none of your personal data will (usually) be stored on the SIM. It's true that technically, a SIM card has the ability to store a limited address book, a small collection of text ...
Johnny's user avatar
  • 1,061
4 votes
Accepted

Can you impersonate someone on a cell phone network if you can get them to enter a magic code?

The first thing that comes to mind is that the scammers are tricking people into enabling call forwarding/diverting. You already mentioned caller id spoofing, which allows the scammers to appear as if ...
nobody's user avatar
  • 11.6k
4 votes

Implementing geo-location factor for authentication

Generally, and putting MFA aside, there is a reason why a mobile app requires permission to access location data: it's a massive privacy violation. If every service suddenly could gather this ...
schroeder's user avatar
  • 131k
3 votes

How does mobile free internet bypass works? (UBT / FBT)

This seems to exploit a vulnerability in how that particular ISP handles quotas. A lot of ISPs implement quotas at an application level and not at a packet level, so they can discriminate based on ...
André Borie's user avatar
  • 12.8k
3 votes
Accepted

Methods to detect calls being routed through Stingray devices?

Can't see anything for iOS but there is an app for Android that claims to be able to do this. However, it only works with a specific chipset and only on a rooted phone. So it is very unlikely that you ...
Julian Knight's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Are there any signs for an end-user of cellular calls being routed through a Stingray device?

On Android Devices you can monitor all cellular Towers you are connected to with AIMSICD (https://github.com/CellularPrivacy/Android-IMSI-Catcher-Detector/wiki) so if you connect to an unknown ...
architekt's user avatar
  • 1,006
3 votes

Security of WWAN cards in laptops

There are almost certainly vulnerabilities in the modem firmware, because firmware is no more secure than other lightly-tested software.) Odds are very good that the card could engage in DMA attacks ...
Adam Shostack's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Do mobile phones automatically connect to spoofed cellular tower antenna?

Yes, your phone will not be able to differentiate between a regular and a fake cell tower and will connect to whichever has the strongest signal. As for the encryption, not really sure what you mean....
knipp's user avatar
  • 589
3 votes
Accepted

Are cell towers basically routers? If so, could one be hacked to spread malware to all connected devices?

Relevant talk: https://media.ccc.de/v/36c3-10737-sim_card_technology_from_a-z Our phones blindly connect to them every day. Wrong, towers need to authenticate; if you're not using obsolete 2G ...
Marcus Müller's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Is it possible to track someone using their mobile number in the UK?

At a technical level, the only entity that should be capable of performing this tracking is your carrier (as far as I know). They are able to locate your phone using the location of cell towers the ...
multithr3at3d's user avatar
3 votes

What makes this cellphone (and the weird instructions) so privacy-friendly?

Nothing. The phone simply has an option to not your send caller ID (i.e. your phone number) to the person you are calling. Nothing too special about it. In fact a lot of telephone network providers ...
nobody's user avatar
  • 11.6k

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