49

Google has access (obviously). The police will have access if they have a valid search warrant. A national security letter will give the FBI secret access. Various three-letter agencies may have access, depending on how they're doing at circumventing Google's encryption. (Google started encrypting its internal traffic after it was revealed that the NSA was ...


46

As mentioned in the comments, I too agree 4 hours in a month is way too low. Understand, and more importantly, make your stakeholders understand that with 4h they shouldn't expect much. Considering they've given you 4h, it doesn't look like they're serious about securing this application either. Based on the comments, answers and my own thoughts I'll try to ...


39

... but they used their own infrastructure It's not really their own infrastructure what they use. They use instead botnets consisting of hijacked systems. These are systems which they p0wn but definitely not own. And thus it is very cheap for them. Apart from that any VPS provider who would rent their VPS for DDoS attacks would quickly lose reputation ...


37

This is Brian Spector; I'm the CEO of CertiVox. Thanks for starting this discussion on PrivateSky, our secure information exchange service. I’ll do my best to answer the intelligent comments and criticisms on this thread. Second, I’ll try my best to walk the reader through step by step on how our integrated key management and two factor authentication ...


27

Start with the Azure top security best practices so you can maintain and improve security of your Azure solution step by step: agree and upgrade your Azure subscription to Azure Security Center Standard. This will help you find and fix security vulnerabilities, apply access and application controls to block malicious activity, detect threats using analytics,...


21

Amazon claims that AWS VPC is "logically isolated" from the other AWS instances, and from the Internet. "Logically" means that it is done in software, not with dedicated hardware system. An AWS VPC can be connected to your VPN and it will use IPsec for that external connection, but this does not mean that internally IPsec is used. In fact, how the "isolation"...


20

From a purely technical perspective, if you encrypt it properly before you upload it, and it stays encrypted all the time it is in the cloud, then the data is very safe. However, there are very probably extra levels of legal compliance you need to meet. This is "Personally Identifiable Information" and there are a lot of laws and regulations that apply to ...


18

Given the current state of public cloud, I would argue that in many cases it is in fact more secure than on-premise storage. Granted I work for Microsoft, but my opinion both pre-dates my employment, and extends to competitors like Amazon and Google as well. Companies whose business models are built on data center operational expertise and excellence, are ...


17

Assuming the document ID distribution is uniform and unpredictable, here's the math: 44 characters long Uppercase, lowercase, digits and underscore = 26 + 26 + 10 + 1 = 63 character alphabet Therefore: Total possible combinations: 6344 keyspace: 263 bits ⇐ 44 * log2(63) And we know that brute-forcing a 263-bit key in any reasonable amount of ...


16

The most sensible approach is to assume you cant rely on their privacy - it isn't their responsibility, although there are some services whose selling point is securing this data. If you take that stance, as long as you encrypt all data before it goes to the cloud you can be safe (decide on what level of encryption you need in order to be safe) This ...


16

Highly customized and patched hypervisors, sandboxes around said hypervisors to mitigate breakouts, and heavy monitoring. Of course, any given server only hosts so many VMs, so a breakout is fundamentally limited to a finite number of guests, if it's able to get past the protections outside the hypervisor. For example, QEMU can be compiled with a hardened ...


15

This is a simple cost / benefit analysis, so it's a business question rather than a security one since you've already decided the merits of how to approach the security aspect. Write your code, benchmark it, and compare numbers in a spreadsheet. For the metal * Cost of metal * Cost per hour in terms of electric bill (assume under full load) * Budget for ...


15

Not instantly. Although, that's what I want to believe. What you could do is the following. Download the Truecrypt version 7.1a and create an encrypted storage file (option 1 from the wizard) and choose 3 algorithm based encryption with a SHA-512 key. Put all your sensitive files in here and upload the encrypted file to Google Drive. When you want to work ...


14

That's a judgment call you'll have to make for yourself, but their technical overview has what I consider a huge red flag: Which data is stored on the Boxcryptor Key Server Private RSA key (encrypted with the user's password) The fact that your private key is stored on their server, even if it's encrypted with your password, greatly weakens ...


14

"The Cloud" is marketing speak for "Other People's Servers". I will use that term for the rest of this post. When you store your data on other people's servers, those people are technically capable to look at your files and also show them to anyone who asks. Whether or not they are allowed to look at them and/or let others look at them should be described ...


13

I would say no its not suitable for storing criticial information, From the sound of their terms Google essentially owns everyting you upload as well as anything derivitive of your data as well. Here is an excerpt from the verge.com explaining the differences of the 3 major players, notice Google is very liberal with what they can do with your data. ...


12

According to the white-paper they use SK-KEM, which is an identity-based encryption scheme. This explains why you do not need the public key of B in order to send an encrypted message to him (the email-address is the public key). Usually identity-based encryption relies on a trusted third party. So their claim that they cannot decrypt the messages ...


10

You'll never be able to know. You can however, exercise reasoning and logical judgement based on The company's ToS. The company's track record. Your trust of the company providing that service. The importance/value of the data handled by that service. Regarding password management; call me a little paranoid, but I really never trust any cloud service with ...


10

Any data you upload to Google Drive (or Skydrive, or Dropbox for that matter) should be considered duplicated by the NSA. Apart from arbitrary queries from the aforementioned secret service, law enforcement agencies from any country may gain access to them through legal means (subpoenas and so on). And of course, Google engineers could in theory browse your ...


9

If you are already settled on using Dropbox, then your only choice at the moment is to use a 3rd party program such as PGP (or free/open GPG) to first encrypt the file and place it into your drop box. I know you said you wanted to use public/private keys, but as an alternative, you could also use 7-zip to create secure archives with AES encryption based on a ...


9

Consider this from an Information Management or Information Assurance question rather than an Information Protection question. To the question if a service provider's level of security is "safe" (sufficient and appropriate), the answer is YES and NO - depending on the level of protection the specific information requires. My suggestion is you create three ...


9

Amazon offers a white paper on this very topic for their Amazon Web Service, and touts several clients who have proceeded forward. See the "Interested in HIPAA Compliance?" sidebar here, as well as this whitepaper. Update: I followed up on the link provided below by Mike Schenk, and found the following statement: Q. Does AWS GovCloud offer better ...


9

If it is a catch-all address, they don't need the actual address. The entire point of a catch-all e-mail address is that it catches all mail that would otherwise be undeliverable. If you have thisIsMySuperSecretEmail@my-domain.com set as the catch-all, then if I sent an e-mail to bob@my-domain.com, you would get the message in the super secret mailbox ...


9

Cloud based DoS attacks are possible, and they do happen from time to time. But it's not a very popular option for a couple of reasons: Initial setup - Deploying hundreds of VMs is not an easy feat, and paying for them isn't simple either. However if you're using someone else's VM, then this makes things a lot easier. Detection - Many providers including ...


8

At 16-core GPU maximum, I'd build my own, unless oclHashcat can distribute work loads (at first look it doesn't seem like it does). That is assuming this thing is going to pound passwords all day most days. If you can scale it more (or want to run a lot in parallel) or wont use it all day long, pay for it by the hour. Now, after some sketching and brain ...


8

While Thomas Pornin is correctly pointing out that the only way to trust a host under attack is using fully homomorphic encryption in practice you can try to work around this requirement. A potential attacker has full control of CPU, memory and disk. So it is not possible to do any calculations on valuable data in a VM that might not be under your control. ...


8

(Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer; don't try this at home.) The U.S. government does have very specific guidelines for government agencies wanting to consume cloud services. Those cloud services must be FedRAMP certified. This is an arduous, lengthy, expensive process... and it's specifically geared toward cloud services, not managed or shared hosting. Per ...


8

In my opinion, Lastpass is referring to the Firefox password manager insecure when the user is not using master password for Firefox. Which won't be apples-to-apples comparison. Firefox uses 3DES for storing passwords and in case master password is not set, null ("") is used, which is insecure for sure. To read in detail about how Chrome, IE and Firefox ...


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