37

There is a very extensive article at Wikipedia and it does not make sense to reiterate everything here. But to give you some highlights: It replaces OpenSSL on OpenBSD, OS X since 10.11 and on some other systems. It started with throwing away lots of stuff which was considered useless for the target platforms or insecure by design and it also added some ...


32

Right now, there is no known weakness with MD5 or CBC encryption or 96-bit MAC as they are used in SSH. So there is, stricto sensu, no security benefit in enacting the configuration modifications that your are proposing. It could be argued that removing support for some algorithms might lead to security issues because it may prevent some clients from ...


18

The option names are not part of the SSH protocol; they are specific to a given implementation. I suppose you are talking about OpenSSH. As per the documentation: RSAAuthentication Specifies whether pure RSA authentication is allowed. The default is “yes”. This option applies to protocol version 1 only. So this does not apply to your case, since ...


14

I will first dispute your reasons for deactivating DSA and ECDSA: There is no known weakness in either which makes them "more vulnerable" than plain RSA. There has been badly made implementations of DSA or ECDSA; however, there has also been badly made implementations of RSA, and in some case it resulted in RSA key leakage (e.g. Bleichenbacher's attack). ...


13

When you use an SSH tunnel, as far as the target server is concerned, its client is the SSH server, not the actual client connecting to the SSH tunnel. For example, if you have an SSH client running on 10.1.1.1, connecting to an SSH server on 10.2.2.2 and establishing a tunnel to 10.3.3.3, when a client (possibly from 10.4.4.4 or anywhere else) connects to ...


13

While this is true, that is true for many applications. If the attacker already has access to the file system it is far too late to worry about your database server. In unix-type operating systems, the configuration file should be accessible only as root (as it is in /etc/mongodb/mongodb.conf). If the attacker has root privileges to change that file, you're ...


12

There may be harm in divulging your .htaccess file. This is usually one of the reasons why there's a rule to block access to .htaccess, like this: <Files .htaccess> Order Allow,Deny Deny from all </Files> The contents of this file may tell users about your configuration, such as where passwords, certificates, and so on reside in the system, and ...


10

Everyone who is really worried about security of SSH probably wants to read this page: https://stribika.github.io/2015/01/04/secure-secure-shell.html It goes through all key exchanges, server authentications, ciphers and MACs that OpenSSH supports and then throws out whatever cannot really be considered secure anymore, giving valid justification for ...


10

One reason is that older algorithms are likely to have wider support. Such defaults probably ensure that the software runs on a wide variety of platforms out of the box. The software itself might also be old. It may be assumed by the developers that you will configure the software to meet your expectations after installation. It may be arguable that this is ...


9

Stricto sensu, you cannot really have a generic test. In HTTP, the client announces whether it supports compression with an Accept-Encoding header line. The server will then feel allowed to use these compression schemes. @Adnan points to this blog post which describes how one can manually send a HTTP request to a server and see what the server responds with. ...


9

Mods certainly can be used as infection vectors. A lot of it comes down to a question of trust. A mod with tens of thousands of downloads and nobody suggesting they've had any problems is likely to be OK (though still no guarantee!). In an ideal world: Wherever possible, avoid mods that have an installer. There are some situations that this can't be done, ...


8

EDIT: As indicated in dave_thompson_085's comment, this solution requires OpenSSH release 7.0 or newer, and will not work for OpenSSH 5.9 as requested by the original poster. Left as a reference for users of OpenSSH 7.0 and newer with the same goals. As per the current OpenBSD sshd_config(5) man page, it is possible to restrict the use of DSA/ECDSA by ...


8

In general, DISA STIGs are more stringent than CIS Benchmarks. Keep in mind that with STIGs, what exact configurations are required depends on the classification of the system based on Mission Assurance Category (I-III) and Confidentiality Level (Public-Classified), giving you nine different possible combinations of configuration requirements. CIS usually ...


8

It is very good advice to not use the web browser for Internet traffic on the server. It's our policy (I work in cyber security for a federal agency) to never use a web browser (for Internet, or external websites) for any sort of Internet traffic even if it's to download a file that will be used on the server. As another user mentioned in their answer, it ...


7

No, when you encrypt a web.config section, you specify which application and site the configuration belongs to. The container is going to be specific to that site and application, and will not be accessible to other applications. If you control the system, then you can do whatever you want, including just decrypting the section. There is no protection ...


7

The answer to this comes down to a risk-management decision that the organization makes. There are best practices, but even the bestest of practices can be compromised by risk-management decisions. There are no absolutes, even patch broken stuff is not an absolute. You had a clue in their response: compensating controls This phrase is used to justify ...


7

There are quite a few possibilities: Someone has changed the log storage directory through a .htaccess or similar configuration file, and the new location is unintentionally within the web root (e.g. they put var/log/apache instead of /var/log/apache as the target) The system has been set up like this with the intention of an IP block preventing access to ...


7

This is probably not news, but since the TLS 1.3 RFC is still in DRAFT, you'll probably cause yourself compatibility headaches if you turn it on for a production server. I would guess this is exactly what you're running up against: TLS 1.3 may exist in some places, but is probably not fully supported all the way through both the client and server stacks; ...


6

TCP forwarding allows users to use SSH to set up a VPN which they can use to tunnel into a network. This could allow an attacker to circumvent network security measures like firewalls. SSH tunneling can be an extremely useful tool, but it is also a security risk, so it should be disabled unless it is explicitly required.


6

PuTTY does not store its configuration in a file. However, PuTTY can use a "proxy command", as described here. In your case, the example config file shows that there should be two encapsulated SSH connections: The outer SSH is done to host login.nets.***. When that connection is done, the command nc is run on that host: it basically forwards data bytes to ...


6

The first repository that comes to my mind for secure baselines is NIST. You can review the baselines for various software and operating systems, inluding Apache here: http://web.nvd.nist.gov/view/ncp/repository


6

One option for this would the Center for Internet Security . Their Security Benchmarks cover a relatively wide range of systems and generally have some useful information in there.


5

(shameless advertisement) There are various Web-based services which can test your server (e.g. SSL Labs) but this works only if your server is generically accessible from the Internet. If you want to test a server for which this is not true, you need a tool that you can run from a desktop system. I wrote one (opensource, free). Remember, though, that such ...


5

Use SSL sitewide. Enable SSL (https). Make sure that any attempt to connect via http immediately redirects to the SSL site. Follow accepted best practices. Refer to SSL/TLS Deployment Best Practices from SSL Labs. Follow all of the advice there, including use of using SSL for all site traffic, marking all cookies as secure, avoiding mixed content, enabling ...


5

There appear to be two main defenses: Detect application crashes. The Blind ROP attack works by repeatedly sending queries to the application-under-attack and observing which ones cause it to crash. It is not at all stealthy: it can easily be detected by the number of application crashes it causes. Therefore, a helpful part of a defense is to monitor ...


5

Your list is a good start, but I would like to add a few technical requirements that I find important when you are building a secure infrastructure. Central authentication / Radius support. I like to integrate the authentication to a central authentication server. This eases management of administrators of the switch, and protects it from bruteforce ...


5

While SSL 3.0 POODLE is a design problem in the standard which thus affects all implementations TLS POODLE is an implementation problem only, that is implementations did not implement the TLS protocols properly. According to https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/security/3009008.aspx?f=255&MSPPError=-2147217396 (updated 04/2015) and https://...


5

TLS v1.3 does not exist in schannel (the Windows TLS library) yet, so it can neither be enabled, nor will it be able to cause any problems. Your app will continue to use TLS v1.2, assuming that is the version negotiated by the client and the server in this scenario until a TLS v1.3 implementation is addded to schannel, it's been made available for the the ...


5

Disclosure: I work for an anti-virus vendor. First, the answer. Most vendors which I'm familiar with usually offer "full" or "offline" installers of their products. Typically they are usually more difficult to find (i.e. no link on homepage - in some cases you might need to ask support), but they do have them. In my experience it is usually easier to find ...


5

You should never be committing secrets to source code of any kind, encrypted or not. The username to authenticate into your server is probably a bit much in terms if sensitivity on its own, let alone a password even if it is encrypted. (As an aside, it sounds like you’re storing your password insecurely - more on that below.) I would highly recommend ...


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