82

First take screenshots of what you find. For the data that is yours, you should catalogue that. Personally, I would download it so you have a reference. You should take screenshots of your own data and avoid data that is not yours. Make sure you include the URLs. Document those in a way that a lawyer can understand. This is likely to become a legal ...


68

I commonly use a Password manager to store and share passwords. There are many password managers that have this functionality. A password is shared from one account to the other, with the notification of the share sent via email to the other person, who can choose to accept, reject, or just ignore the share. The communication of the password is secure, ...


66

Here is what they spy on, finally officially admitted after being proved again and again by different independent sources. That should make a pretty good idea on what actually is transmitted. To actually see what's being reported you can give yourself permissions for %ProgramData%\Microsoft\Diagnosis directory and look what's in there, but the file are ...


61

A common practice is to send the user an initial password via email which is only valid for a very short time and needs to be changed immediately during the first login. This is not perfect either. An attacker with read access to the user's email could intercept that initial password before the user and use it on their behalf. The user would notice as soon ...


38

Memory dumps often have document contents It's worth noting that if you're sending a memory dump of a crashed application at the moment of its crash (which is a reasonable way of analyzing crashes) then that memory dump is very likely to include the contents of whatever document(s) were opened in that app at the time. So if you're "just" sending app crash ...


26

You typically want to contact the hosting company to take it down and hold all data and logs under a legal hold. You could also contact the other companies affected. Legally, you will need to contact a lawyer and the law enforcement in your jurisdition.


25

Two factors Perhaps it's not literally appropriate for your situation, but one reasonable way to send sensitive data over channels that aren't entirely secure is to ensure that two separate factors are required to access that data and that they get sent over different channels. For example, I've seen approaches where the data is sent over email in an ...


20

It should go without saying, but make sure that those login credentials are not working on your system. If they weren't deactivated when he left your organization (when they should have been), you'll want to audit your access logs to make sure they haven't been used since he left -- if they were on a public website where anyone could find them, you should ...


17

If you are a regular member of staff at the company, your correct escalation should be through the Infosec team, and fall back to the Legal and IT departments if your company isn't big enough to have a dedicated Infosec team. I would also copy HR on any communication. This is an extremely serious scenario. If you don't know what to do (and the fact that ...


8

My payment processor supports recurring payments via "credit card tokens". This means that when someone makes a purchase, either you or the customer will send their credit card to your processor, and the processor will hand you a token back. Unlike a credit card, that token cannot be taken somewhere else and used; it's only valid between you and your ...


8

If you encrypt the disk from the start, when you first start using it, then this isn't a problem. All data you write is encrypted and remapped sectors just lead to encrypted data being remanent on the over-provisioned area. Since the data is encrypted, you can't do anything with it even if you recover it using direct flash reads on a disassembled SSD. ...


8

If you trust it, onetimesecret (which is open source) exists for this exact purpose. When you send people sensitive info like passwords and private links via email or chat, there are copies of that information stored in many places. If you use a one-time link instead, the information persists for a single viewing which means it can't be read by someone ...


8

For getting it taken down, you could have a US lawyer issue a DMCA takedown notice to the hosting provider, asserting that you own the content and have not consented to it being distributed - this should get an immediate reaction if the hosting provider honours DMCA notices, to which the contractor can respond.


7

FDE does not need to know anything about overprovisioning. If the partition is encrypted, no plain-text will ever be written anywhere. Blocks reserved for wear leveling will either have un-initialized random data, or encrypted blocks. If you are using the encryption provided by the controller, encryption/decryption occurs inside the controller, so no plain ...


7

This is like many other questions which can be simplified down to "could x be vulnerable to y", where the answer may boil down to "yes, it is possible, but unlikely". For example, I highly doubt that well-known and reputable password cracking software is going to straight up try to run the cracked passwords as commands (side note: it is unlikely that ...


5

Is there any security advantage of hiding route parameters Yes, if they contain anything potentially sensitive. If you pass information as URL params, either in the query string (?key=value) or as part of the path (/someValue) then these are cached in various places in the browser and host machine. Most restful services expect you to pass some form of ...


5

Viable? Probably not.... Years ago, I read an article proposing placing ads for a topic and targeting them to a geographic location. Then the mere fact that you got billed suggests that someone at the target location was googling your topic. I'm not sure it's very viable, as the author seemed mostly concerned about buying ads for their own name and limiting ...


4

Run a tool such as GitRob or truffleHog to find sensitive information in your repositories and then use BFG to remove the data from your GIT history. Replace all passwords listed in a file (prefix lines 'regex:' or 'glob:' if required) with ***REMOVED*** wherever they occur in your repository: $ bfg --replace-text passwords.txt my-repo.git That all ...


4

What you are seeing is a cached view of the previous partitions. If they appear to persist even after a wipe, this is a result of the kernel caching the last known partition table in memory. It does this because it does not expect the layout to change at runtime, so rather than re-read the table each time the partition layout is queried, it reads it once at ...


4

E-mail is not a good mechanism for sharing plaintext passwords given its inherently unencrypted nature. If passwords are shared in this manner the service should ensure that the password is changed on first login to reduce the exposure (and to allow you to detect if someone has used the stolen password), not a perfect option as it still allows someone to ...


3

Even a fake passport scan was sufficient to take over a Facebook account generating $100,000/yr in revenue. A real scan might be instrumental in taking over all sorts of other, more valuable accounts, such as crypto exchanges. However, these are just known potential dangers of passport scans falling in the wrong hands. There is a thriving black market for ...


3

The first questions to ask here are IMHO: who is the owner of the data? what is the responsability of each part? For the first question the answer is the client not you. So if they want to publish their data on their facebook page, it is their problem, not yours. And as the owner of the data, they must be able to get it from you at any time, because they ...


3

I don't understand why you are sending them the passwords ? The clients set their preferred password, you hash it, store the hash, and no one except the client/his password manager program knows the original password (not even you), and when they forget it, you send them a reset link. However if you really have to send him the password, I suggest you send ...


2

You can add an external lib to the product, made in C/C++. Python can import those just fine. Add a couple vital functions on that library, and change the library a little for each client. An interesting way of doing this is to use internationalization to encrypt most of the strings, and use the external library to decrypt them. Use a custom key to each ...


2

In RAID-1, writing to the array is always equivalent to writing to each drive individually. However, if I am to separate them and connect them as separate drives, will I have more chances of recovering the files? In theory, any drive may accumulate damage over time. A damaged sector that is taking too long for a read to return or which is failing more ...


2

I can see a couple of potential issues with a solution like this: If a users (old) password is compromised, then an attempt to log in with it can be used to confirm that the user exists, and has an account - probably not a big deal in the context of FB, where most accounts are searchable anyway, but I still think the principle holds in general. If someone ...


2

Modern CPUs often have layers that operate below the level of the operating system (eg system management mode in x86 processors) so if the firmware controlling that lower level is compromised then the OS can be attacked. People with specific knowledge of the hardware design would have an advantage compromising such lower level modes. Smart phones often ...


2

This White Paper from SANS discusses network architecture and the use of a DMZ: https://www.sans.org/reading-room/whitepapers/bestprac/infrastructure-security-architectureeffective-security-monitoring-36512 The PCI DSS is related to cardholder data but, if you substitute 'sensitive' for cardholder, the guidance is pretty good - see requirement 1.3.6 Place ...


2

It may be possible to trace your identity, yes, or at least to detect sensitive information (such as user name, computer host name, or timezone, which may pass through from the host to the virtual guest, depending on settings). Instead, you should use a tool designed for the job, like the live bootable Tails operating system. It is designed to leave no trace ...


2

Memory protection schemes(DEP,ASLR,etc), I/O protections(e.g. guards against write-corruption), buffer/cache clearing, etc are a couple examples of controls to protect data in motion. Basically: any controls that are concerned with maintaining data integrity and security while it is resident within a computer system but not at rest, rather than while it is ...


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