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Passwords should be stored hashed and salted Because we must assume every database might get breached, plain text passwords should not be stored anywhere. Instead, the password should be hashed, which is a one-way algorithm, preferably using an algorithm that is slow to calculate and using different and long salt for every password. There are many articles ...


3

This doesn't look like a SQL Injection attack to me. A SQL injection attack would contain SQL keywords like select, update, delete, drop, etc. But, it does look like user input is not being sanitized properly before being written to the database, and this could open the door to other types of attacks such as XSS attacks. So, you might want to take this as a ...


3

There is no definitive list of PII that should be encrypted. Encryption is a security control that mitigates risk. There are many other controls than can achieve the same result. So, you need to perform a risk assessment to determine what stakeholders require, what regulatory/legal obligations you have and what risks you face that could be mitigated with ...


2

I want to save people the trouble. I would object with another question: Is it secure to run someone else's SQL file? Are you really doing the correct thing by posting a SQL? I have tried to reverse perspective from producer (you) to consumer (me). This script is very likely innocent and, apart from @mrSotirow's answer, does not pose a particular security ...


2

Basically there is not so much information that attacker can use, but lets see an example scenario: You will allow users to download the mysql dump file from your web host, and the file will include the operating system and version this may give the attacker ground to step on and try to find exploit for that OS and version, but unless is very outdated there ...


2

If there was a standard, easily answerable way to make a local network "absolutely secure", most of the community here would not have jobs. It's not nearly that simple. Network security is incredibly complex. And the environment, the people using it, and the people attacking it are constantly changing, adapting, and evolving. Can an attacker from ...


2

SafetyNet's hardware-backed attestation hasn't been defeated yet and the way it works, it is infeasible to defeat it by software. Universal SafetyNet Fix Magisk module downgrades evaluation type to BASIC which is software based evaluation that is defeated by Magisk. All Google apps licensed android 8+ devices are provisioned with TEE so all of them support ...


1

There are a bunch of practical problems with this approach if you implement it securely, and the only way to avoid those is to implement it insecurely, which is likely how people would end up implementing it. First, in order to securely store a password, you need random salt. That means that a function like PASSWORD('password1') is not deterministic, and a ...


1

You need to identify your threats and risks (risk assessment, threat analysis etc.) to identify how an attacker might steal the information, and what that would mean for your organization (what is the business impact). You mention "all over the world", which makes your case a little special. It means that you should be aware of security and privacy ...


1

As schroeder says, if there is a requirement for people to have access to that data then grant them that access. However its quite trivial to add in an anonymization tier that maps any email address to a local email address then provision a forwarding service at the receiving end of the generated address which forwards to the intended recipient. Gumtree, for ...


1

As a secondary answer, it is safe to remove such headers and publish only the plain INSERT statements


1

Your question is a bit "wide". The attack that you described is plausible. Of course and as you said there might be different ways of accessing: Deprecated software with available exploits exposed to the internet could open a door to attackers Phishing attacks could be another vector of attack It is hard to explain all the different alternatives ...


1

As a fundamental of security engineering/incident management, if your system is compromised, You must rebuild your system. Because now attacker has enough details about your system. Even if you change encryption key, algorithm, password he still be able to attack again. Because you don't know how he compromise password. If you change password or key, still ...


1

The "stealth operations" you speak of not only require the ransomware to be able to modify open files, but to be able to modify the data stream returned to the application (in order to hide until it springs the trap). Either you are talking about a shared library injection into every running process owned by the current user (which can just use the ...


1

It depends on the purposes and permissions you have to use user data. Encryption is not really means of blocking third party access to the data. Databases per se are protected, so data access is already restricted to outsiders. It is more that encryption is a way for you as data processor not to have access to data that you're not supposed to have access to, ...


1

VPN Although your whole company no longer uses a VPN; you can still use a VPN. You can provision a VPN that is only used for this scenario: Create a VPN server (plenty out there to choose from) Connect the destination database server to that VPN as a client Configure each company user to that VPN as a client Each company user connects to the VPN when they ...


1

I expect the answer is actually the opposite: partial passwords are less secure than full passwords. Why? Because real-life users need things to be easy. To guarantee this, they will do all sorts of things that make security experts cringe, like writing down their passwords and using weak passwords. Partial passwords make things even more difficult, so users ...


1

The short answer - This is a SQL Server limitation. SQL Server (as many other Microsoft products) have a long battle between user experience and security. One of the decisions along this battle was the desire to show the list of databases in Management Studio. This decision was done long before multi-tenant databases become popular, and resulted in a server ...


1

The /etc/php/N.m/apache2/php.ini already contains a section to store the MySQL username and password, if mysqli is used: [MySQLi] mysqli.default_host = mysqli.default_user = mysqli.default_pw = This password can be easily read via php get_cfg_var method echo get_cfg_var("mysqli.default_pw") It could be an security issue if the hacker can get the ...


1

Of course. Depending on how the database is configured to handle growth. The database can grow to fill an entire disk or partition, for instance, and that can crash the database, the service, or the entire server.


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This is less a question about SQL Injection itself, and more about this particular ML based implementation. I had to look at the code to understand better what the author tried to say with this example. To the best of my understanding, this is actually a very poor example, let's remember this is a tool supposed to execute SQLi attacks, not to just run ...


1

You really, REALLY shouldn't be exposing your database server to the Internet, no matter how good of a password you have on it. Keep that sort of thing entirely within the cluster; doing otherwise is just additional attack surface you don't need or want. With that said, the basic principle you describe - terminating TLS at the load balancer, which ...


1

I'm going to write a short answer anyway, even though I believe this question is not relevant in this community, and it's probably going to be closed soon (I see 2 close votes already). Here are some relevant parts from PorhHub's privacy policy: Your Rights Related to Your Personal Information You may exercise your right to access and deletion [...] [...] ...


1

Protecting the key ("obfuscation" might be the wrong word) assumes that there is some attacker which should not see the real key and/or should not be able to use the key. Without such potential attacker (which might be the user itself) there is no need to protect the key in the first place. Just guessing the key is in your scenario kind of ...


1

Technically, you cannot protect a system against its administrator. So when a company hosts a site or an application in an external computer center, they trust that computer center to behave professionally. For that reason, it in common not to externalize the most sensitive informations. As usual when it comes to Information Security, everything ends as a ...


1

Why we don't put certain data in the URL First of all, one big reason not to include certain data in the URL is because (1) URLs are saved in your browsing history, which makes it much easier to get your data with just your history (cookies are usually changed as you use your web applications and request data is usually not saved), and (2) URLs aren't ...


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The answer is not far away, you need an Id to extract the user, however, the Id would be an UUID instead of running number which can easily be pooled. You can easily use code libraries to generate the UUID for your continence.


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