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I will share an experience that MAY have little to do with InfoSec and might also be flawed, but it was the best method we knew on that time. It may also include obscurity, known to be controversial. At the school I used to go, we had a lot of problems with property (belongings) and we had to deal with them. By this, we could have anything stolen by anyone; ...


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You are not actually asking to apply a signature to a real life object but you are only asking how to create a signature which can be associated with you and with nobody else. What then happens with this signature is another thing: you can attach it to the object you own or you can attach it to an object you don't actually own. Others can remove the ...


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GPG and Browsers trust certificates in fundamentally different ways. How do Browsers do it? Browsers need a set of trusted root certificates. These either come bundled with the browser, or the browser relies on the root certificates that the OS provides. When trying to validate a certificate, the browser checks first if the certificate matches what the ...


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No. GPG has various strategies for letting the user configure what keys they trust, but it's up to the user to do that. There is no central authority that can vouch for you, like there is for HTTPS.


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Yes, code signing with asymmetric crypto is very common. The exact mechanics vary by OS, but the general principal that the author of the software package, or the central repo / app store, or both, signs every code package with their asymmetric key: Android code signing system iOS code signing system Windows code signing system Linux (ex.: Red Hat) code ...


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