185

One possible explanation is that DuckDuckGo is using the headers that are sent in your request to determine their display. For example, it is very common to use the Accept-Language header to determine in which language a webpage should be displayed. This header is set by default in all modern browsers based on the language preference settings. My browser, ...


161

I'm the founder of DuckDuckGo. D.W. is right, if we were to violate our privacy policy we could get in a lot of trouble. Additionally, I've tried to be as transparent as possible on how we operate, both in our privacy policy and on my blog. I've thought and explored external verification, from someone like the EFF for instance, but I don't think that really ...


153

There is no proof that DuckDuckGo operates as advertised. (There never is, on the web.) However, that is the wrong question. DuckDuckGo is very clear in its privacy policy. DuckDuckGo says it doesn't track you, it doesn't send your searches to other sites, by default it does not use any cookies, it does not collect personal information, it does not log ...


47

I had the same problem: Google always responding in my native language, even though I used a VPN elsewhere in the world. I wiped all cookies and so on....to no avail... and then I found that I had an IPv6 leak! Google was using IPv6, and saw my home IP as usual. It wasn't "tracking" me, I just contacted Google straight around my VPN. Do the test here: ...


29

What D.W. said. But also, You don't have to trust DuckDuckGo. You don't log in, you can clear cookies, you can change your IP address, you can access it via Tor. Not being an appendage of an identity company (e.g., Google) is a big privacy plus to begin with.


17

I arrive late to this question, but hopefully I can contribute some useful information which will also help others make a more informed decision regarding the trustworthiness of DuckDuckGo. This answer gives a few reasons to believe that DuckDuckGo is putting its privacy policy into practise by investigating the technical aspects of DuckDuckGo as of 2012-08-...


11

It is not possible to prove that it will operate this way, but it is very easy to use it the way they advertise it. I also agree with D.W. and started using it some days ago. I deleted google from my search engine list but had some problems trusting ddg too, since I'm a slightly paranoid person, but it provides a secure connection, I use it over tor and ...


10

From DuckDuckGo's &t= page: Through partnerships with developers and companies, DuckDuckGo has been integrated into many applications. In these partnerships, a portion of DuckDuckGo's advertising revenue is sometimes shared back. To assign advertising revenue and collect anonymous aggregate usage information, developers add a unique "&t=" ...


10

I think @punpun1000 is right, you can easily test your browser language by visiting this website - https://browserleaks.com/ip or just simply run this JavaScript code: alert(navigator.language);//works both in Mozilla and chrome alert(navigator.language);//works both in Mozilla and chrome alert(navigator.userLanguage);// Works in IE More about regions and ...


7

There's no difference: DuckDuckGo doesn't offer any privacy protection when redirecting the search to another result page with a !bang. E.g. !google foo (https://duckduckgo.com/?q=!google+foo) just redirects to https://google.com/search?hl=en&q=foo using both meta refresh <meta http-equiv='refresh' content='0; url=https://google.com/search?hl=en&...


4

It is never easy to prove these things, but people are moving to DuckDuckGo often for privacy reasons. It takes ages for a brand to gain a positive name and in the Internet age it can take as little as a few minutes to see your good name destroyed. With the first news articles that DuckDuckGo breaches its promises to its users, they will start to leave as ...


3

TL;DR: It is not safe. First, I find it strange that you access your bank using a search engine in the first place. It is one of the main rules to protect against phishing attacks: never just follow a link to your bank (from mail, from another site) but always enter the known URL or use a bookmark you've setup yourself. And, while I'm pretty sure that ...


3

Definitely not, the duckduckgo is easy to fool with positioning phishing sites on top search results just like bing so when you search for your banking site it may point you to other website. Especially if it's some kind of small bank.


3

Here's another bit of evidence you can trust DDG if you're paranoid: they make it easy to control what information gets sent to the target host when you follow a link. Maybe you can't really know what they're keeping in their logs, but you CAN know how they treat your interaction with the link targets, and you can control it if you like. Try this on both ...


2

Use ddg.gg instead of duckduckgo.com; the ddg.gg shorthand URL--in addition to being quicker* and easier to remember--by default takes you to the HTTPS enabled version of the site. *Quicker as in typing, not as in performance; an HTTPS connection will naturally be slower than an HTTP connection (all things being equal).


2

What browser are you using? For example if you use firefox and set up DuckDuckGo as your main search engine it will use HTTPS by default. Firefox DuckDuckGo Plugin This are the instructions for firefox, chrome, opera & safari . The great thing about DuckDuckGo, is that you customize it to your need (settings). You can specify there under Privacy ...


1

No. DuckDuckGo is just a search engine. Search engines can simply help you find your desired websites - in fact, Google is one. Some are more protected and anonymous though, some are less. But when accessing a website there are lots of other factors that can make your connection to the website unsecure: malware presence on your system - Keep your antivirus ...


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