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2

Just that unexpected password-protected zip attachment with the clear password included in the mail would make me suspicious. Not all password protected zips are malicious, but if you are encrypting a document to protect it from prying eyes, it would be preferable to send that separately through a different medium (such as a phone call). It is also uncommon ...


3

In addition to using a static analysis tool such VirusTotal, I would recommend a sandbox analyzer tool as well. You can find one online such as hybrid-analysis (I am not endorsing this software but merely giving a concrete example). If you have experience with malware, you can perform a more in-depth analysis of the binary to determine if it is safe or not. ...


6

Question: How to quickly find out what exactly the threat nature of a password protected archive without getting infected? I will be answering this question. As you want "quick" results, you could do dynamic analysis on the malware. I recommend having a malware sandbox to do it for you. You throw it in there. It runs, it tells you who it is attempting ...


8

I am wondering about how to find out the exact nature of the threat in a secure way Doing malware analysis yourself is pretty hard - malware is often designed so that it can't easily be reverse engineered. Your best bet is searching for the VirusTotal results - unfortunately, there may not be any definite information on what your specific malware does ...


0

It could either be the email address or an issue on their end if they are outsourcing their newsletter email address via a public mail list sending provider (ex: mailchimp) The only thing I can think of for an issue with your email address, is if the developers at the back-end, made sure the email data you placed is an actual email address. This job is ...


0

Even though I am not aware of an explicit exploit, I would draw a different conclusion. Anything that is security related should expire, because you can not know what will be possible in the future and because a token is a form of credential. Here are some more reasons I would take into consideration, other than the (personal) backup. Most important, ...


0

I got emails from Netflix too saying that my account was cancelled and that there was a sign in attempt somewhere from the US... except that I live in Canada, and have never made a Netflix account in the first place. I went directly to the Netflix website and was able to speak to a representative, and they deleted the account. There was no payment ...


0

it was possible to be infected with malware just from simply opening the email? Yes, technically it is. [1, 2] Images can have embedded content that is run when your browser or email client trusts external senders (e.g. showing pictures in emails by default). This is why it is especially important to not trust pictures in emails by default unless you know ...


0

DNS can be altered but most likely you would notice something was amiss. For example if someone caused mail.example.com to resolve to a different IP not controlled by me, without ever compromising the original mail.example.com, then I would be prompted to accept a new key when I authenticated over ssh. Unless they fully compromised the original server and ...


1

There is one mitigation of this problem: registry lock for your domains. If you subscribe to this service, changes pushed by the registrar to the registry will NOT be applied until the registry double check, separately, that those changes were indeed called for (by contacting relevant people). This makes any change cumbersome (and is a problem for DNSSEC ...


2

They would have to change the upstream nameservers for the domain back to their own DNS-servers, where they could host a copy of your DNS-records with only the MX-record changed. As long as the upstream NS records remain pointed to Cloudflare they can't override only the MX record. So, you could monitor that your domain's NS records at the upstream registry ...


49

Yes, your registrar can hijack not only your MX records, but your entire DNS. Not only that - but they can then proceed to intercept mail sent to your domain, get a valid CA-signed SSL certificate for your domain, and host a site for your domain using the trusted SSL certificate. And DNSSEC won't prevent any of this. One of the primary functions of your ...


9

In theory it should be possible for cheap-unsecure-domains to hijack our MX records answering them by itself instead of referring to Cloudflare. Is this correct? Yes it would be possible for them to do this. Although they can't without you noticing. So you can monitor this. If yes is there any type of protection against this kind of attacks? Except using ...


2

"In theory it should be possible for cheap-unsecure-domains to hijack our MX records. Is this correct?" This is correct for a domain registrar company that is not reputable and it's security to be considered lackluster! Good companies offer security services and suites for their customers, but this often comes at a cost, hence there are users who frequent ...


0

Voice calls are subject to error and misunderstanding. You should bring some other means of getting data from user, e.g. web forms or SMS. Anyways, you better set some arranged response, then send a simple empty verification e-mail to that client expecting that. For example, you can tell the customer a 2-digit number over the phone which must be written in ...


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