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0

By clicking on links inside an email you're actually doing a HTTP GET request. Probably before sending this phishing mail to you they (who create phoshing sites) automatically added some identifier to that link to be able to check later who got an email and who clicked on that link, when and from which IP and from which browser, etc. So they can identify you....


0

Remember that crime is now commoditised and supported by a large framework of services. Any single email you receive might be part of a dozen different criminal services. So, what is happening exactly here is not going to be known without access to the services used. We can only speculate. The first hop is the easiest to guess. SOME_LETTERS_AND_NUMBERS is ...


1

You have an argument for yes as the default, but you will have to go to the ICO/court if someone wants to challenge that. As the case law for GDPR is very thin on the ground, you are potentially the test case, which is a bad place to be. If it goes to court, it will cost time and money. Even if it doesn't get to court, you will be paying lawers so it will ...


-2

You're fine, Just clicking the link will have been harmless if the page didn't load. As long as you don't download/install something or enter personal details on sites like that you've little to worry about.


0

Regarding GDPR compliance, you're not violating the registered persons rights by displaying otherwise restricted content for authenticated users - that is, unless the information you display contains personal identifiable information, like the individuals health information, home address etc. Personal information must be kept secure and not disclosed to ...


1

Compromised Email Accounts Unfortunately it is clear that your mail systems have been compromised. That's the biggest take away here. If your emails are never reaching the customer then at some point in time someone gained (and probably still have) access to at least the alice@mycompany.com email, if not your entire email system. There's an important ...


1

I don't think that there is a standard way that this type of fraud is perpetrated, but I can tell you what I have seen and what I do when this happens to us, when about once every two months we get "change my bank account" emails sent to suppliers "from" our mail systems. Our first thought is that the scenario didn't happen and that we have fraudulent staff ...


0

As mentioned by Z.T., the email would not have been encrypted, but only signed. Since you were seeing an empty mail with a smime.p7m attachment, it seems your usual email client is unable to show S/MIME mail. Opening it with a more robust client (in this case Thunderbird) fixed the issue by properly showing the content.


2

When you Enable Editing or Enable Content, you enable any macros embedded in the document to run. An attacker can embed VBA (Visual Basic for Applications) macros in the document, which is really just a generic programming language. With it they can access information about your computer, access resources like the network, and get malicious code like a ...


2

To "Option (2) doesn't even ask for his current password": I don't understand how can it be. To request password change, user has to log in into his profile. For this a password is required. May be you mean that user doesn't use master password in the password manager and effectively log in without entering any password. If this is your case, then you are ...


1

The problem that i see with your question is that both the threats that you talk about in option (1) & option(2) are the threats where an attacker has physical access to your system.When you are developing a web application this is not the threats you should be worried about. Always remember:- If an attacker has physical access to your device.Its not ...


0

As highlighted by @lonix the Password Reset workflow and Password Change workflow are similar and do have intersections but they must be well segregated on execution level. Hackers are interested in grabbing credentials and any bug/loophole in the credential handling process will be exploited for sure. As we have seen additional information about the login ...


2

Using an asymmetric encryption. Create a public/private key pair. Share the public key in chat Now someone can send data to chat encrypted with your public key. Data can only be decrypted with your private key no body but you can read it.


10

They may be able to tell that you have read it, but they shouldn't be able to get your IP address. Since 2013 Gmail has proxied images through their own servers, so "tracking pixels" will only get the IP of the Gmail server. This only applies to the web client though (and I believe Gmail's official smartphone apps do this as well, but I haven't tested). If ...


-2

Yes they can get to know your ip address with HTML emails by including a request in img tag. This is how email trackers work to check whether users have read an email or not. But in case of gmail they proxy the request so the ip will be of google servers.


0

No. The sender of the email can't see anything that is happening inside your inbox. An email may ask to send a "read receipt". If sent, that will let the sender know the email was opened. It still will not reveal the IP address of your computer.


4

In my professional experience, this is not a common step from "hackers". However, I don't have any hard numbers to back that up, so I wouldn't take that statement as anything more than anecdotal evidence. However, it's worth stating the obvious about why the hacker did this. What it really comes down to is that the attacker used this, effectively, as a ...


1

If the attacker was able to execute PowerShell in your environment he or she could have used the Set-Mailbox cmdlet to do this. It can set up forwarding for any user and leave a copy in the original mailbox so it’s quite transparent. Your bigger concern is: someone is able to run PowerShell in your environment with the permissions of your Exchange admin and ...


2

"Safe" for whom? I'm seeing a significant risk for your organisation to accept any of those things. Personal data is a "toxic asset", which means its liabilities are greater than its assets. If you accept those things, then you are responsible for those things for as long as you store them. There are many regulations that you would have to be mindful of, ...


1

For me it was a matter of how efficient the verification process was and how well it actually worked in practice. [ verification code ] can be generated with the specific complexity you need/want will most likely reach target can be protected itself in various ways from interception (like being sent as a small picture or even as a blurred captcha-like ...


3

The overall goal is to verify that a user can be reached through the email address. This is done by creating a token, and any way of delivering that token back to your server will do, whether it is having the user click a link or copy/paste (or retype) a code. Since your list includes password resets and email resets as reasons why you might send a token, ...


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