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1

This is very weak security on all fronts! The user's password is P4$$w0rdP4$$w0rd and it's encrypted using XOR encryption, with the key CdZ4MLMPgYtAE9gQ80gMtg==. This produces the ciphertext posted by the OP above, WeJcFMQ/8+8QJ/w0hHh+0g==. To verify: First, use xxd to get the underlying binary of the plaintext password: echo -n 'P4$$w0rdP4$$w0rd' | xxd ...


2

Is the charset of CSS and JavaScript resources strictly defined by a standard? No. It is similarly flexible as with HTML, i.e. can be defined in the style itself, by the embedding HTML or in the HTTP header or even with a byte order mark. If not explicitly defined it might also have a default or might depend on the charset encoding of the embedding document:...


4

The cipher-name in your example is not '@'. The field you're looking at is actually the hdr_size field. The mistake you've made is trying to decode a LUKS2 container with LUKS1 encoding. In the table provided, you've shown that the second field (bytes 6-8) are the version data field. And your hexdump clearly shows that the first LUKS container (luksVol1) ...


3

So I am confused about how server knows how many time it have to decode URL Always only once. And this is true for other encodings too, i.e. binary data in mails are encoded once with base64 or quoted-printable, unicode is encoded once with utf-8, HTML encoding is applied once for characters like < etc in HTML etc.


2

To answer your questions, we have to understand what malware in an mp4 file actually means. An mp4 file isn't an executable, so it will not run any (malicious) code directly. Therefore, if a mp4 file contains malware that wants to execute instructions, it has to exploit a vulnerability (e.g. a buffer overflow) in the program that plays the file. This can ...


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