New answers tagged

2

If someone steals my unencrypted, password protected laptop, would they be able to get into my Google account? Yes. Each time I reinstall my system, I am asked for my password and security code. This is true even if my home directory has been left intact during the system re-install. It seems that Google somehow fingerprints the operating system to ...


2

Just that unexpected password-protected zip attachment with the clear password included in the mail would make me suspicious. Not all password protected zips are malicious, but if you are encrypting a document to protect it from prying eyes, it would be preferable to send that separately through a different medium (such as a phone call). It is also uncommon ...


3

In addition to using a static analysis tool such VirusTotal, I would recommend a sandbox analyzer tool as well. You can find one online such as hybrid-analysis (I am not endorsing this software but merely giving a concrete example). If you have experience with malware, you can perform a more in-depth analysis of the binary to determine if it is safe or not. ...


6

Question: How to quickly find out what exactly the threat nature of a password protected archive without getting infected? I will be answering this question. As you want "quick" results, you could do dynamic analysis on the malware. I recommend having a malware sandbox to do it for you. You throw it in there. It runs, it tells you who it is attempting ...


8

I am wondering about how to find out the exact nature of the threat in a secure way Doing malware analysis yourself is pretty hard - malware is often designed so that it can't easily be reverse engineered. Your best bet is searching for the VirusTotal results - unfortunately, there may not be any definite information on what your specific malware does ...


3

the hassle of full disk encryption is not worth it. You have Windows 10 Pro so you can just turn on Bitlocker encryption with like three steps (these three steps were yoinked from this Microsoft reference): Sign in as an administrator account; In the search box on the taskbar, type Manage BitLocker and then select it; Select "Turn on BitLocker" and then ...


1

There is an Advanced option on right click of folders natively which allows one to turn encryption on in Windows. How good is this? That is Windows "Encrypting File System" (EFS). It is very convenient to use, but it offers no protection against an adversary able to log in to your Windows account. Also, you won't be able to unencrypt any of the files or ...


1

I personally like to use x.509 or pgp certificates to encrypt and sign files on my computer. The x.509 (ssl and client certificates) option will be a little more advanced though. PGP will be the easiest option as there are GUI applications that can encrypt/sign files. You can see a list of PGP applications here. For PGP on Windows, I would recommend gpg4win ...


2

They're very different things, so it's hard to bring them under one hood. PDF protection/encryption is a kind of joke, really. All in all, it's not made to withstand actual attacks. So the "benefit" is mainly to prevent your 8-year-old (or your 80-year-old parent) from reading a document. PDF protection is much like hiding caller ID when making a phone call....


0

File-level encryption has its uses, although usually relies on passwords or passphrases which can be the weakest link in the protection mechanism if they are short or easy to guess. If you want to send someone a file, you can do this using file-based encryption and not necessarily rely on encryption of data in transit. In addition if the file is intercepted ...


2

Think about devices that are always powered on. The number one example is phones. Here, full-disk encryption won't help a lot if the device falls into the hands of the attacker because the single key that allows to decrypt the entire disk will be held in memory when the device is in your pocket. File-based encryption allows more fine-grained control over ...


2

Where you wish to email or share (on a file-share or online system) where you don't trust or have no assurance in the trust of the messaging or file-system admins? TLS between mailservers doesn't mean that the attachment is encrypted in your inbox*. In a corporate environment, for example, you might want to share a Doctor's report with your manager and the ...


14

Full disk encryption provides no protection whatsoever against attacker with remote access while your machine is powered (as by definition FDE requires data to be decrypted on every access). So in order to use machine at all, you must unlock all data. To contrast, encrypted files are decrypted only on explicit user request providing password. That means ...


80

File-level encryption can be useful in several cases, here's a few examples: Sending data over insecure channels. You mentioned TLS, and that's enough when you have it. But what if you aren't sure every node actually uses TLS? And do you really trust every node? Think about emails, for example. Storing data in untrusted places. You might trust your ...


13

The only point I can see is a low-skill attacker which has access to the machine with the encrypted file. Essentially if a friend / family member has access and does not accidentally see something. Do I miss a scenario? Your assumption that the only way an attacker can have access to your computer is by being physically present is completely wrong....


3

You mentioned most of it, mitm, family/friend access to files, losing of devices. Another thing most people overlooked would be in the corporate side of things, compliance is another factor to look at. Data protection policies etc. How about hosting your encrypted files in another person or organization's infrastructure? Cloud services is a huge thing now, ...


Top 50 recent answers are included