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Yes, of course. Sending should update the copy on the keyservers adding the new signatures (note that it is possible that they already had those signatures which would lead to no changes on their copy). Additionally, while this would be the traditional action by the keyservers, please note that some keyservers may be read-only (not allowing you to upload ...


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My guess would be that you are trying to use an ECC key (or subkey). The version of gnupg that comes with Amazon Linux is too old to support ECC cryptography. If you look at the output of gpg --list-key 40BXFE61, you can check for any pub or sub entries that have cv25519 or nistp256 in them, e.g.: pub rsa4096/E63EDCA9329DD07E 2011-11-07 [SC] ...


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It depends on your use case. From cryptanalysis point of view, symmetric is theoretically better as long as you have a really strong passphrase, because: GPG encryption with RSA just encrypts the symmetric key which encrypts the actual file. So, there are two potential weak points instead of just one. RSA and many asymmetric ciphers can be theoretically ...


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If an attacker was able to recover your encrypted file without the private key, then RSA would be broken, and you'd have much bigger things to worry about than just an encrypted file. If they somehow have the private key (again, you probably have bigger things to worry about if this is the case), they will not be able to use it without knowing the passphrase....


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You might want to try using pgpdump to test if the format of the public key that the user entered is valid. See https://superuser.com/questions/696941/human-readable-dump-of-gpg-public-key for more information.


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An easy workaround I found is to run a bash script in the background that reloads the gpg-agent every X second. Specifically, append this to ~/.bashrc: while true; do gpgconf --kill gpg-agent; sleep X; done & where X denotes how long, in seconds, you want the pin to be stored for. Note that this script will also kill any other gpg related processes, so ...


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The following will emit the "username < email >" field from the UID packet, without requiring regexes: $ gpg --with-colons --list-keys 0xDED9B508F4E10DB2 | awk -F: '$1=="uid" { print $10 }' blah <a@b>


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I also wanted to do this (with symmetric encryption, no keys) and Xen2050's mention of gpg-preset-passphrase was helpful, but I still was stuck on how to derive the correct cacheid to use with gpg-preset-passphrase to associate the passphrase with the encrypted file. tl;dr the cacheid is the 8-octet hex-encoded s2k salt randomly chosen on encryption, ...


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