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68

By just passing (potentially malicious) traffic through, it is very unlikely. After all, routers on the Internet are relaying tons of malicious traffic everyday without getting compromised themselves. However the danger begins when your computer itself gets compromised from a malicious file downloaded via torrents, and from there the malware on your ...


32

When your phone is acting as a hotspot it's basically just a router connecting two protocols together (802.11 and either LTE or GSM). It's not actually interpreting any of the data passing though, as that would use a lot more CPU and memory. It's literally just passing data back and forth at OSI Layers 2 and 3. That said, it's no different than other ...


10

Do you think that there's something wrong with this idea? Yes, quite a few points. Passing everything through TOR has the following consequences: Much slower traffic, which on a public WiFi spot is killing Constant security checks. Google, CloudFlare and Akamai all require CAPTCHAs. Every once in a while is OK, but on all requests can become irritating. ...


9

Not really. The torrent data just flows through the phone, it does not analyze or execute the data except what is necessary to forward it to the PC. Also, remember that torrent does not always mean malware.


6

It highly depends if your phone has a public IP or behind a NAT in this case. If it has a "white external IP", it can be potentially hacked as all the rest of the addresses that can be accessed directly. If it's behind a NAT, then no problem.


4

Yes, a WiFi Hotspot is a proxy which has the means to perform many acts including malicious ones. Be it an android phone acting as a WiFi hotspot or a router or any other devices. Passive Snoops on your traffic, data credentials like passwords etc. Active Redirect you to malicious links resulting you in downloading malware or ...


3

This looks more like your first Google link was actually an AdSense campaign, and the campaign itself had been subverted ("malvertising"). While Google strives to keep its campaigns free of evil :-), the market is so alluring that lowlife advertisers and outright criminals strive even harder to get their wares through, and squeeze the most out of the few ...


3

No you cannot. Ubuntu hotspot uses WPA2-PSK with a pre-shared key (not a password). Pre in pre-shared means both parties must be supplied with the same key before connection takes place; both parties need to use the same key to be able to communicate with each other. If "the password entered is wrong" (i.e. different than you know), it means you will not ...


3

Sorry, ignore my earlier comments, I somewhat misread your question at first. The eduroam network is asking you to accept their certificate so that your device can then use the public key linked to the certificate to make sure the server is who they claim they are and securely submit your login credentials for the network. So yes, this has to do with the '...


2

By virtue of being connected to the internet at all, there is always a potential that your phone could be attacked and compromised. On the other hand, making your phone act as a hotspot should be unlikely to increase that risk, even if downloading torrents. On the other other hand, if you do questionable things with devices on your internal network (i.e., ...


2

Content downloaded from the torrent may be or contain viruses and other malware's but torrent itself is not so. TORRENT is a file extension for a BitTorrent file format used by BitTorrent clients. Torrent files contain text and point out the trackers for a download to begin downloading from distributors (known as seeders) and requesting clients (known as ...


2

Those devices are small computers running some flavor of Linux, and just like any consumer-grade router their firmware is horrendous and outdated, so malware on it is definitely possible and likely. However the malware, if any, would most likely be a generic DoS or spam bot designed to attack the open internet rather than attacking the devices behind it. ...


2

Is it possible to access the routers web interface and modify setting if the administrator changed the default password/username of the router? Hopefully not but some routers have one or even multiple backdoors. Or in case of MikroTik a CSRF attack against the administrator could be used to change the password if the system is not fully patched. Why ...


2

If the factory reset does not work, you should assume that the ROM itself got hacked. He probably simply installed a backdoored ROM, cooked to order (I've seen such ROMs made available for children's phones - whatever you do, Mom will still be able to track you and read your chats and emails). So, to all intents and purposes, that is his phone, no longer ...


2

Only allowing TLS enabled traffic would protect users from traffic monitoring on the transport layer, but it's still possible to see which servers a user contacts. So an attacker gets server names and he could still gain useful information from requests/response size, timing, contacted servers. But it's very unlikely that an attacker could extract passwords, ...


2

The redundancy issue isn't that big a deal in most cases. In any case, TLS requires careful configuration to be secure and this isn't always the case so using a VPN as well rarely hurts. The captive portal issue though is, indeed, an ongoing problem. The best solution is to use a configuration that ONLY allows traffic from the VPN client to reach the ...


2

Depends on the device you want it to cover. If you activate it on the phone, it will route your phone and your computer’s traffic through it. If you set it up on your computer it will only route your computer’s traffic. If you activate the VPN on both devices, it may cause interference. Using a USB cable to share internet is substantially safer than setting ...


2

If you're connecting to pages over HTTPS, they can only see the domains of what you visit. So if you're on https://www.example.com/cats, they will know you're on example.com, but not that you're on the cats section. However, if you're only using HTTP to connect (so http://www.example.com/cats/Oskar), they can know you're looking at the cat Oskar, as well ...


1

It is unclear why you would think a phone hotspot is any more or less secure then any other form of WIFI hotspot - thr risks are pretty similar. I guess there is an additional risk of the phone falling into the wrong hands and the password extracted, but this is probably a relativrly small risk, and not that different from the passphrase being extracted/...


1

If an attacker is able to access a wifi network (either an open one, or has the security key for it), he or she is able to see all of the traffic that is being sent to other users on that network segment, even if he or she is not connected (associated) with the access point. Additionally, the attacker may also be able to perform a Man-in-the-middle or Man-...


1

I have done this on a large scale at an enterprise. What we did was create an air gapped network with a new drop from an ISP, and AD servers this got us a stable and reasonably secure baseline. Then we created new VLANs on the core network where we switched user groups over on a scheduled basis, ensuring each was quarantined/reimaged and brought in to the ...


1

This question is a little convoluted, but you seem to have conflated network authentication methodologies with SSL (TLS). WPA2/ Radius is not a proxy, so MiTM is not applicable. SSL / TLS provides end-to-end encryption for data content. How those packets are routed in terms of WiFi is irrelevant. Think of it this way: you have encased a letter in an 800 ...


1

Does the honeypot have a singular SSID, or is it more like the question where he's constantly changing the name so that phones automatically connect? If it's a singular SSID, what's the name of it? If he's named it a common hotspot name like "attWifi" or something, your phone might be seeing it and automatically thinking it's a public hotspot. There could ...


1

If it is a logging only proxy, you cannot. As you speak of Wifi, I assume that you connect through DHCP, so the default router is obtained through DHCP. That router actually proxies all traffic between its Wifi interface and its internet interface. From the outside, you cannot guess whether a spying system has been installed here. On the fly rewriting of ...


1

Specific reasons for "why" this could be happening are numerous. Do you work in a tightly regulated facility? Could your employer have something to interfere with radio frequency emissions in the vicinity (intentional interference or not)? The first thing to try is changing the wifi channel your hotspot uses, if the iPhone allows this. Top things I would ...


1

One would not go wrong with CoovaChilli. CoovaChilli is an open-source software access controller, based on the popular, but now defunct, ChilliSpot project. CoovaChilli works on Linux operating system and probably other *NIX systems too. I have not tested other operating systems. CoovaChilli allows you to flexible authentication using Radius server, ...


1

You can see this post. The name can change if the internal app changes. So an upgrade of the apk or even if you upgrade the system can do this change. You say in your comment that your colleague didn't made a system upgrade. Ok, maybe only upgrade his apps on play store. That's enough.


1

TL;DR: "Tor Browser plus being careful and ready" should be completely equivalent to "Safepay through BitDefender WiFi Premium protection". In your scenario, both are per se equally secure. The data being sent on the air is encrypted, so connections to HTTPS sites without either Tor or BitDefender, and connections to plain HTTP sites with either of them, ...


1

I think you're falling into the trap of looking for a technical solution to a managerial problem. This is a case of users circumventing security. Try talking to them; why would they want that hotspot? Does the official Wi-Fi network have shortcomings that they're trying to work around? As long as this is not addressed they will find ways to work around ...


1

Vulnerability for this transport are quite unlikely, which is more than extremely unlikely as for routers because Hotspot is not (pure) routing as other said. phone's hotspot has a DHCP (super)user program that assigns in the IP/802.11 transport local IP addresses to the potential N wifi clients and dialog with the kernel over EDGE or UMTS or LTE or similar ...


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