Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
68

Try to think of it this way: When you are logging in to any website using SSL, you are most likely passing password in plain-text over HTTPS (for eg GMail). The only difference that Basic-Auth makes is that username/password is passed in the request headers instead of the request body (GET/POST). As such, using basic-auth+https is no less or more secure ...


48

As outlined in the bug report, the issue is that an authentication dialog shows up on trustworthy.com, so oblivious users (and let's be honest, many users who pay attention as well) will type in their username and password, not realizing they're actually sending it to malicious.com. Combine this with a very similar looking domain (e.g. trustw0rthy.com), and ...


12

You note the need for authenticating the client and ask about the security of HTTP basic auth, over SSL. This is what SSL was designed for and will work fine so long as the password is a good one. If you're really setting this up for just a single client, that is easy to ensure by picking a long random password, e.g. 12 characters using a good source of ...


9

I think I know what's happening with you. Actually, that's exactly what I do with the image in my "about me" section in my StackExchange profiles. It's a .php file that grabs some information about the visitor (IP address, browser type, whether the visitor made the smiley happy or not, etc.). I simply rewrote the URL to show two different images that are in ...


7

If you aren't using HTTPS then this information could easily be picked up by anyone sitting between you and your server and reused. If you are using SSL/HTTPS to encrypt the link, then you should be fine.


4

This is called a 403 phishing attack, and the only way you can prevent it is to prevent user-generated-content from containing links to external resources that are rendered on your pages, like images. Fortunately, it's not a particularly common attack, but it can be concerning, particularly if the credentials users use on your site are more likely than ...


3

Firefox (Firefox 68.0, under Linux) doesn't store this info in Cookies and Site Data but in History. You need to go to Preferences->Privacy & Security and under the History section, click on Clear History.... Make sure the Active Logins checkbox is checked before you submit.


3

I am using this myself for many things, and as long as you don't ignore any TLS warnings from the browser you should be good. TLS works below HTTP, so any data transmitted through HTTP will be encrypted. It'll be as secure as submitting any password form. Instead of using a self-signed certificate though, I would suggest using Let's Encrypt. They provide ...


2

Another argument not mentioned (I guess) so far is the fact that many mobile devices such as smart phones do not let the user check the certificate when doing basic auth over HTTPS in the browser. That means that unlike with forms based auth you cannot bypass the basic auth popup which is a modal dialog on most mobile platforms to check the certificate ...


2

ZAP supports HTTP basic authentication natively, so you wont need to use Zest in this case. If you know that an app uses basic auth then you can set that up via the API. However I recommend that you start by using the ZAP desktop as this is much easier to use when debugging issues. For specific help with this its probably quicker to ask on the ZAP User Group:...


1

Using Basic Authentication over HTTPS is considered to be secure as the main issue with Basic Authentication is that the credentials are sent over clear text. However, there are some common practices that make using Basic Authentication a bad idea. The following are some examples: Usually no request limiting is put in place - This can allow brute force ...


1

Here is a bit more context for history. Just like others said Basic Auth over TLS works well if you can live with a few limitations. Used on the client side, you probably need to deal with session management, which is rather hard with Basic Auth. On the backend, Basic Auth performs well but relies entirely on TLS for confidentiality and integrity. It is ...


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