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92

Be very, very careful. It's not KRACK that is the problem, it is a lax attitude to security and privacy in general. So called "smart" consumer products can often be hijacked, accessed from the internet, or monitored. As a customer, it is hard to know if any specific product is safe or not. The Norwegian Consumer Council has been on the case for a while, and ...


86

No. You should not rely upon the obscurity of your firmware in order to hide potential security vulnerabilities that exist regardless of whether or not you encrypt/obfuscate your firmware. I have a radical suggestion: do the exact opposite. Make your firmware binaries publicly available and downloadable, freely accessible to anyone who wants them. Add a ...


84

The devices are designed to be accessible from outside the home. To offer this service to their owners, they make themselves accessible through the homeowner's router/firewall. The way they do this is by sending a UPnP packet to the owner's router that tells the router to open a port that connects back to them. They then listen for connections that arrive ...


48

Let's look at your fridge. Why is it connected to the Internet? It could send maintenance data to the manufacturer, connect to stores to order food for you, or tell you its contents ("fridge, how many eggs do I have?"). If you classify this data as having no impact if adversely affected, then yes, a massive infrastructure like PKI would have little value (...


15

Your understanding of the attack is not as clear as you think. In this article, Krebs mentioned that the attackers didn't really have to hack the devices. The vulnerability was well known, they just had to scan the internet for those devices. Sure, if SSH/Telnet to the devices was disabled, the problem would have been solved easily. To make the matter worse, ...


15

It really depends on your threat model. I wouldn't be particularly worried about a particular sexual predator in your local area having the technical skills necessary to utilize Krack to inject voice into the toy. Unless it uses the vulnerable Linux driver, the key clearing won't work and the partial nature of the compromise for a general reset would make ...


14

Almost all IoT devices of the sort we are talking here (ie, consumer level) are deployed behind home grade routers (or ARE home grade routers) and are using IPv4 and NAT/uPNP to reach the internet. That means they are sharing an IP with legitimate traffic for one and for another are using a dynamic IP, not a static IP, meaning there's even more ...


12

Welcome to the Internet of Things(IoT). This is a... thing. Therefore, it can be assimilated Mirai is a type of malware that automatically finds Internet of Things devices to infect and conscripts them into a botnet—a group of computing devices that can be centrally controlled. And One reason Mirai is so difficult to contain is that it lurks on ...


11

Doubtful it would be beneficial. It is by far a better option to push it open-source than closed source. It might seem silly and even controversial at first, but opening up a project to the public has plenty of benefits. While there are people with malicious intents, there are also people wanting to help and make the internet a better place. Open source ...


10

Your misconception is here: secured private wifi networks Whilst many home WiFi networks are secured against unauthorised wireless devices connecting directly, many are wide open to access from the wider Internet. It's this access (that's demanded by the IoT devices to perform their legitimate functions) that can be abused (and on a much bigger scale ...


8

Actually, the Mirai virus was looking for a specific vulnerability present in the Linux operating system. The Mirai virus targeted Linux devices running telnet via busybox. If busybox is not installed on the Linux device, the exploit fails as Mirai uses busybox specific commands. If busybox is confirmed to exists, Mirai then performs a bruteforce attack on ...


7

This is pretty much the same kind of toy as CloudPets. Those were toys that allowed talking with the children (toy) by using a mobile app. The security was terrible. It turned out that both the user details and the pet recordings were available on databases with no password. And the company didn't even answer to the mails alerting them of the vulnerabilities....


6

wouldn't it make since to start giving IOT devices a static IP No, because IPs only work in the proper network context. An device's IP needs to be routable, which is to say, sitting on a network with routers that know how to communicate with other networks and are willing to do so on behalf of the device. First of all, if you hardwire IPs and send them ...


6

When people think of Internet of Things. Most think of various devices with a myriad build of different operating systems and functions. However it's really not that complex if you look at it as a whole rather than from each individual pieces. Depending on your choice of operating systems. Most have their own security guide and the applications are in fact ...


6

A well-designed firmware should rely on the strength of its access key rather than relying on the attacker's ignorance of the system design. This follows the foundational security engineering principle known as Kerckhoffs's axiom: An information system should be secure even if everything about the system, except the system's key, is public knowledge. ...


5

Is it safe to assume that in local networks attackers will not be able to intercept a request for login page from a browser to a device and send a hijacked login page instead with malicious JavaScript? No, you cannot assume that unless the connection itself is reliably protected (e.g. an inaccessible UTP cable or already authenticated WiFi connection).


5

Some people argue that code which is open source can be audited by many and therefor contains little bugs. On the other hand, attackers have the same easy access and also look for these same vulnerabilities. There is definitely a tradeoff here which is not correctly described in previous answers. Others mention that code should be inherently secure and ...


5

Internet-enabled anything poses a risk. As a rule, security is an expense and consumers as a whole really don't consider product security when making purchasing decisions. For example, there was a thread on Reddit recently about a couple who got divorced and she didn't change the password on the Nest thermostat. So while she was out, he would crank up the ...


5

The problem is less the open access to a server with some unimportant task. The problem is more that this server is probably located in the same network as more important systems (unless your home router provides network separation, most don't). Thus if an attacker manages to hack into this unimportant server he gets access to your whole important network. ...


4

IoT Security Frameworks IoT Security Frameworks generally fall into 5 categories: wearable, home, city, environment, and Enterprise. Enterprise software is usually in the purview of OWASP, which has the OWASP IoT project. Enterprise software often transacts PII and payment-card information, which makes it fall under PCI DSS regulations. While not yet ...


4

Follow the instructions in your router's Users Guide to create a Guest wireless network (Section 4.7 of the user's guide.) This makes your router advertise a second wireless access point. Pick a different name for it, such as dharm0us_guest. Uncheck the box marked "Allow Guests to Access My Local Network". Pick a password for the guest network that is ...


4

The way IP addressing is done for IOT devices doesn't matter in a DDOS attack. Here is the reason why. IOT devices may not always be exposed to network with an external IP address. It can also be device behind a NAT which has only an internal IP address. So irrespective of whether it is DHCP or some static IP, provided by the router to the device, from ...


4

Only you can decide your fate. Follow what makes you happy, where your passion is, and as you evolve through your career that drive will change multiple times making you a better candidate to employers. Network with others, goto conferences, and keep on learning!


4

IDS is not about either penetration testing or malware analysis. An IDS inspects traffic (typically) to look for Indicators of Compromise (IoC). An IDS, then, is a consumer of whatever the IoCs are, and developing the IoCs is a function of malware and malicious traffic analysis. So, to develop IoCs, you might want or need to know quite a lot of about ...


4

The CA private key that belongs to the self-signed certificate is only used to sign certificates and, possibly, to sign OCSP responses or CRL's. So besides signing (future) child certificates, it may also required to establish the status of already issued certificates. If this is not expected to happen often then you could store the private key away on an ...


4

The authenticate tag (M) should be as large as possible. The larger it is though, the more overhead for transmitting a single message. Generally you would want the tag to be at least 80 bits, which is 10 octets. Ideally, you should have a tag of 128 bits, or 16 octets, or M=16. A larger tag makes it more difficult for an attacker to forge messages without ...


3

When you setup your Nest, you create an account for it and sync your devices to the account. So all the information tying your app to that particular device is saved in a Nest database somewhere on their servers. In your scenario you're asking how the Nest passes through your firewall to see what your account settings have told it to do. Your phone app can't ...


3

I would suggest that rather than trying to protect the camera from the outside world with a firewall that using a black hole router as the only gateway for these devices would be more restrictive - also if you have a physical device at the router's address then it would make monitoring of egress attempts more visible. Also, point the device to the same black ...


3

While I'm not aware of any actual, certified standards, there is no shortage of recommendations from national organisations such as NIST, CESG, Anti-fraud agencies and the like. StaySafeOnline is from the US National Cyber Security Alliance US CERT has a home and business section SANS have a document called Cybersecurity Inventory at Home The UK's CESG have ...


3

UPNP opens ports on the router without user intervention. This means in your example the FTP server would (could) be exposed on the internet by the IoT itself. This means if there was a vulnerability within the FTP server or poor programming/setup by the IoT company, then an attacker could attempt access just as if you had manually port forwarded the port ...


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