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I do not think there is any security increase, rather there would be a security decrease. The localhost or 127.0.0.1 is only accessible from the host computer, or the computer running the web server. A website listening to only 127.0.0.1 under normal conditions, would never be accessible to any other computer on the private network. Using a private IP ...


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Is it possible that a hacker used "dirty tricks" to remotely drive my computer and initiate DDOS attacks? Backdoor software? Absolutely. Remote access, backdoors, bots, etc. they all give someone else access to your machine. Botnets are used for a variety of actions, including DDoS attacks. Is there a way to spoof someone's IP address making it ...


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In general, you can't. IP addresses are assigned to organizations, not regions. Those organizations may in turn assign address blocks to specific regions, but some don't. The steps for figuring out what IP address your target might have would go something like this: Figure out which ISPs operate in the area Figure out which IP address ranges have been ...


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Yes (unless the wrongdoer took precautions) To sum it up, approximately: the ISP CANNOT trace the person (map the person, they have business with, to the site user). They cannot even know there is a site the person accessed. The website CANNOT trace the user (map the user to the person). GDPR ensures that the log data are split among the parties in such a ...


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This is an interesting question! I'm assuming the operative scenario is a Web Server objects to some event associated with client IP nnn.nnn.nnn.xxx where "xxx" is unknown. In order for the Web Server to have functioned, it clearly knew the full address including the "xxx" at the time, but the premise is that it dutifully forgot the last ...


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