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execlp does not have an absolute path for chown here, so you should be able to manipulate the PATHand get arbitrary code execution. In order to do this, write a simple C program which calls system shell like : #include ... void main(){ system("/bin/bash"); } Save this file and compile this program using cc program.c -o chown Once this is done,...


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The good part here is that you want to completely install a new OS. You don't need Windows to work or not be infected. In fact, you could fill the disk with random data prior to the Linux install in order to ensure nothing is left. You mention that you are concerned about something there latching into the new OS. A virus installed on Windows affecting a ...


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TRIM is handled internally by the SSD controller. There aren't any standard ATA commands to obtain this information, and if there are vendor specific commands it's unlikely they are documented. A simplified example of TRIM: The OS writes some data to the disk at location 0. At this point, the OS can read the data back whenever it needs to. The OS no longer ...


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OpenSSL & GPG have different implementations of same algorithms, so with current versions, aren't compatible eg. different magic bits (until someone comes up with an intermediate software that translates between the two eg. translator or virtual machine). This issue arises in every new technology/industry (cf. NTSC & PAL, MacOS & Windows, Diesel ...


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I had the same question and ran into the same scary-sounding answers/comments here on stackexchange. After reading the lwn.net article linked in another answer, and reading all the apparently-relevant answers here on stackexchange, I think I have made sense of the issue. The problem seems to be that creating an isolated environment involves cloning a "...


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The first important thing to understand is that you can't program a computer to do something randomly - however complex the algorithm you write, it will always go from some initial state to some final state, and if you can perfectly recreate the initial state, you can perfectly recreate the final state. The second important thing to understand is that you ...


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DAC does not cover all potential security permission situations that MAC would. ACLs are very flexible compared to DAC. For simplicity's sake, DAC only allows you to control rwx, right? With DAC, you can be much more explicit and on the syscall level control what is allowed. For example, you could allow someone to append to a file, but not overwrite/delete ...


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If one already has all privileges anyway then using techniques for privilege escalation do not make much sense, except maybe for hiding what you were doing from the logs. Escaping to the shell from inside a command is usually used if one was given only limited privileges, like sudo being restricted to edit a specific file or similar.


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