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Meltdown does not directly impact integrity, but it totally violates confidentiality. Whether or not the violation of confidentiality is sufficient to also violate integrity (e.g. read root password, become root, and load malicious kernel module) depends entirely on your system. In other words, Meltdown on its own is exclusively a read vulnerability, not a ...


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I think using a pid for this is probably inappropriate. It doesn't guarantees what you are checking (because pids can wrap), and it may leak information, and it provides a path for the remote to forge pids and scan what pids are on your system. It would be better to generate a handle (session cookie?) and keep track of the background script in the server ...


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pid has limited utility to derive information about the host's system state. Eg. low pid would indicate recent reboot, high pid a long running system (depending on the load and services). Attacker could constantly monitor your actual pid and make educated guess about uptime. Eg. predict if an important kernel security patch was applied or not. If the polling ...


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Other answers have thoroughly addressed the nature of Elcomsoft's capabilities and explained that there is no known cryptographic vulnerability in LUKS itself. To answer the core question "Is LUKS encryption effective for hard drives on home computers?," you must consider the value of the information you are trying to protect, and the risk that you ...


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Configure secure boot and use LUKS for FDE along with initial user login password for accessing the system. You can go with any one of the options 2,3 or 4 for storing the LUKS keys. It will provide some level of security wherein if someone stole your laptop and do not have access to USB or Network (from where keys are accessible) it will infeasible to ...


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In GDB you can examine a function and get its address from its symbol name using: x myFun However, hardcoding a function address in your exploit is basically betting on the odds that the binary's address space will never change, ASLR is a protection that will get in your way when trying to hardcode a memory address as It will randomize certain segments of ...


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While LUKS offers strong protection against brute force attacks by using thousands of iterations of a hash function during key derivation, we have significant advances in password recovery attacks compared to what we had in the past. Brute-forcing a password today becomes significantly faster due to the use of GPU acceleration, distributed and cloud ...


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No, Elcomsoft cannot break LUKS or Veracrypt. What they do is to guess the password. Any password-based encryption mechanism can be broken by guessing the password: this is not a flaw in the encryption software. Encryption software can and should mitigate the risk of guessing by making it costly. Both LUKS and Veracrypt do it securely (at least with default ...


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The passphrase of a GPG key only protects the specific storage of the key, i.e. it is basically a file encryption. Since the key in the computer B is only logically the same (i.e. same data) to the key on A but physically different (different file on different computer), the changes on the passphrase in A will not change anything on B. Of course this will be ...


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There is no easy guide or hard guide as such for Linux hardening. You at least need basic Linux understanding to harden the Linux systems. Also, you should know what you are doing before following any online tutorial regarding the hardening steps. Blindly following the hardening steps will only give you false sense of security. If you understand basic Linux, ...


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Qubes OS comes to mind: https://www.qubes-os.org/ You can create a Whonix Gateway, or create a ProxyVM with any VPN that you like to use, and then route your AppVM through it. Here's the instructions: https://github.com/Qubes-Community/Contents/blob/master/docs/configuration/vpn.md


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TPM will definitely add an extra layer of security to your laptop. if you configure LUKS without TPM you either allow automated mounting or select the prompt option i.e., prompt you before decrypting the disk. So, in either case, you are storing the keys in the disk. (Still secure by kernel) Whereas if you use TPM your LUKS keys will be encrypted by TPM &...


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A basic level concept of security vs "ease of use"; you CAN NOT have both at the same time. You can either increase security, like go above and beyond and forget accessibility, or the other way around. For Example, you can definitely prevent WebRTC leaks by doing a pre-30min preparation before "Checking your Email". WebRTC is an ...


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I have been in the situation many times, but usually it is not a problem. Just connect it to a secure internet connection behind a router and start downloading the updates. If you are connected to your ISP directly then it is unlikely that there will be active attacks against your IP interface or updater (and those are likely well protected anyway). You ...


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Auditors in general audit against a set of specific rules, guidelines or baselines. If you don't produce a reasonable baseline yourself, they will use their own baselines, and then you get requirements like this. The principle of least privilege (PoLP) refers to an information security concept in which a user is given the minimum levels of access – or ...


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