15

The easiest way would be to just spoof your MAC adress. Just listen to the network, watch which MAC adresses are able to connect and then give your own device the same MAC adress.


14

The question in the original title of your post ("Can a website still detect my real MAC address even if I use different virtual machine each time I visit the website?") is different than the question in the body of your post. To the question in the original title: No, a website should never be able to "detect" your MAC address, under any circumstances. ...


7

There is no effective way to prevent a dedicated attacker from creating multiple accounts. No matter what you do, the attacker will still be able to create multiple "sock puppet" accounts. The best you can do is raise the cost of creating additional accounts. One approach is to require the user to provide a mobile phone number, authenticate the user's ...


7

MAC addresses are not usually available outside of your local network so that won't be an issue. If you use a different VM it could be possible to fingerprint you if you're just cloning the same base machine repeatedly (e.g. panopticlick), however if you use different base machines, then the only likely way to identify you (assuming you don't authenticate ...


6

In wireless networks, the signals travel through the air; anybody can listen to them and capture the source MAC address. Therefore, it's easy for an attacker to find out the white-listed MAC addresses and impersonate them. Think of it this way: A group of friends talking to each others, and they only talk to people they know. When one of them says something,...


5

MAC filtering doesn't provide an high security. An attacker can simply see which devices (and their relative MACs) are connected to your network, and spoof one of theese MACs. When he changes it to his machine, he can connects to your network without any problem. In conclusion, MAC address filtering doesn't increase your security.


5

I am not sure of any commercial implementation, but I saw an interesting idea that you can track physical proximity using signal strength, which AP, etc and determine that if the location suddenly is very different, that is likely a spoofer. I also found an interesting paper on spoofing detection using a fingerprinting technique. The captive portal will be ...


5

Short answer: Does MAC filtering in WLAN protect against MAC spoofing? No, in no way. he manages to spoof one of the user's MAC address, You make it sound like that's a hard thing. The MAC address used by your network card is a setting in the network manager – trivial to change. MAC addresses of other users can be observed in plain text on the air, ...


4

It is really that simple, if the AP has a MAC filter, any device which attempts to authenticate that doesn't have a MAC address on the list will just be denied. However the problem from a security perspective (which is why this should not be used as a security function) is that it is trivial to spoof a valid MAC address (by sniffing them wirelessly and ...


4

In Windows vista and above, the OS allows change to specific MAC addresses only, which are, the addresses starting with 2A. However, as far as I know, there is no such limitation in Linux. I suggest you try to spoof your MAC again in windows, this time choose an address starting with 2A and see if it works this time. EDIT: It doesn't have to be exactly 2A. ...


4

To sumpplement D.W.'s excellent answer... You can't read the MAC address of a client across a router. A MAC adress can easily be changed (so easy it doesn't even dserve the 'spoofed' epiphet). A browser user agent is not unique and again trivial to change. The only 'Computer name' you'll see at server end is the DNS PTR record for the IP address - hence ...


4

I've read that the way wifi works is that your computer sends out requests looking for any wifi it recognizes. That depends on the configuration of both the access point (AP) and your device. Most APs periodically emit beacon frames, where they broadcast their presence along with the wifi's name (SSID), capabilities and other information. Your device can ...


4

So it appears that this service is vulnerable to MAC spoofing. I'm not sure that I see a direct security concern threat here. You've demonstrated that you can bypass their licensing to access the service for free. That's not necessarily a security problem. But as @AndréBorie has pointed out, activity performed by the MAC spoofer will appear to come from you....


4

As other pointed, you first need to snoop existing mac addresses (using wireshark) and spoof them. Except that : You probably will not get significant packets if you plug your device behind a switch (due to the way switches function). You probably will not get any packets at all if the MAC filtering function is provided by a switch that filters by MAC and ...


4

According to my research on the subject, and running tests there are no quick fixes for tracking the source individual perpetrating this type of attack because of the nature of it. Meaning tracking, but not filtering/blocking. The attack method itself is basically easy to do compared to the scale of other types of attacks out there due to fundamental flaws ...


4

I have no idea where you got your information, but let's start at the very beginning citing reputable sources as we go. This youtube video shows the process for enrolling a new device in WhatsApp. Since WhatsApp is built on the same cryptography as the Signal app -- called the Signal Protocol (source), let's assume they do the same stuff inside (Signal is ...


3

Switches, Hubs, and Broadcast In old-style ethernet networks connected with a hub, all packets were broadcast to all stations on the network. This is also the way wireless networks typically act today. But in order to improve network performance, switches have largely replaced hubs in connection stations together. Once a switch sees a packet originating ...


3

The MAC address of the network card can only be seen inside the local network. I think you cannot be really anonymous inside a local network anyway. But apart from that most network cards can be set to a different MAC address using software. There are various ways to change your mac address with different NICs, but I would trust hardware more if it was ...


3

Partially, yes. Windows OS (eg. using ipconfig command) sees the spoofed MAC address as the permanent MAC address. However you can NOT say all of the applications running on Windows will see the spoofed one as the permanent one. Applications might be using some ways to acquire the permanent (burned-in) MAC address of the adapter. (For instance they might be ...


3

When using a phone while logged in to your accounts, you're visible. I remember reading an article that a determined owner can track you between APs and thus know your location and routine. Now I found out that one can randomize one's MAC address, so I was wondering if that can prevent my identification and consequent tracking. Spoofing your MAC address ...


3

The MAC address only identifies your network interface. That is all. It does nothing to change, alter, spoof or hide your device ID's such as OS and OS versions, services running on open ports, what websites you connect to, the IP address you are using, etc. All of these things are still visible. There is a reason cybersecurity professionals advocate many ...


3

MAC Whitelisting as well as Blacklisting are pretty much useless for security. Your strong WPA/2 passphrase however is great (if WPS isn't enabled). As kub0x said, the Layer 2 info isn't encrypted. MAC addresses are fully visible: If you have a laptop or a wifi card, install or VM a linux distro and fire up the aircrack suite. With Airodump-ng, you can see ...


3

Neither method requires WEP nor WPA authorized access to the network, just proximity. In Windows I use Nirsoft WiFi Channel Monitor to expose the MAC's on a particular AP. It's a single file/no installation truly portable app. http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/wifi_channel_monitor.html It requires MS Netmon drivers but they're free and ready to use without a ...


3

It is not easy or depending on your usage pattern it might even be impossible to fully hide the use of multiple devices on a single ISP connection. It also depends on the effort an ISP is making to detect such "abuse" and on its willingness to fight such abuse even if he is not 100% sure since detections might result in false positives. The usual way to ...


3

If your neighbor is using your WiFi, the fundamental problem is that they have your password. Change your router password to a strong password and make sure you use WPA2 authentication. Make sure you perform the router change from a wired connection and disable WAN side administrative access. Spoofing your MAC address would be a poor choice for them ...


2

Using a different VM means you're using a different computer, so theoretically you're a different person. If they DO identify you as the same individual, they are potentially doing so incorrectly -- or at least would be incorrectly assuming OTHER unique users are actually the same person. The way they would almost certainly be doing such grouping is by IP ...


2

The behavior you describe is true. However, the trick is that the attacker software will not keep the stolen port for itself, it will proceed in the following loop: Steal the port, Receive some data, Give the port back, Forward the data to the real destination, Go back in step 1 by stealing the port again. You can find more information in Ettercap ...


2

You appear to have answered your own question. An advanced user can spoof a MAC address, but non-advanced users cannot. MAC address filtering provides limited access to those who do not have the skill to spoof a MAC address.


2

Try sudo macchanger -r (interface) or sudo machchanger -a (interface) While interface is down, then bring it back up again.


2

Is it possible to access the routers web interface and modify setting if the administrator changed the default password/username of the router? Hopefully not but some routers have one or even multiple backdoors. Or in case of MikroTik a CSRF attack against the administrator could be used to change the password if the system is not fully patched. Why ...


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