New answers tagged

-1

Since the methods that you mentioned are about changing the connection in some form, that is not supposed to occurs when you are disconnect from their network. However, if someone is able to put something in your device (like a malicious certificate or an app, for example) when you were connected on their wifi, so it will allow them to perform a post ...


1

This answer is inspired by my conversation with MechMK1 in the comments. The problem that MechMK1 points out in the comments basically boils down to authenticity, which is often seen as the achilles heel of public key cryptography. How can you be sure the public key purporting to belong to the person that you are attempting to connect with really belongs ...


0

No attacks from the outside are possible as long as you always use the localhost address (127.0.0.1) to connect to the server (and you only bind to that address too, just to be safe). However, malicious software which may be running on your machine can still intercept localhost connections. This is very unlikely but possible. SSL wouldn't do much good ...


5

There's no way to guarantee the ability to listen to all TLS traffic from a given host. As you mention, the malware might not even use the system security store. It also might have a hard-coded certificate (or at least public key) that it is expecting, in which case it will notice any attempt at a man-in-the-middle attack unless you can steal the server's ...


0

Just to complement the answers above. A man in the middle attack is just forwarding the data it receives after looking at or modifying it. You can do some stuff with it, like changeing some values or denying communications. Online game hacking is basically this same stuff. For example, the device sends a jump command, you can intercept it and change it for ...


-3

This is definitely not overhyped. It can be done. I did the same thing recently to my test phones. The attacks are indeed possible with the right tools, and the victim wouldn't even necessarily know. One of the phones, I was able to dump call logs, sms messages, and contacts. I also accessed the mic for recording and both front and rear cameras for ...


18

Everything derives from installing the App. Normally phone Apps are signed and limited to designated App Stores. You would have to disable unknow source protection, and manually allow installation. After that, the phone is owned and MiTM isn't even a factor. So yes I think it's overhyped.


40

All the attacks are possible and not over-hyped. In fact, these attacks are found in the wild. But you missed a detail that makes your conclusions incorrect. There are some steps that the attacker and the victim take that are skipped in the video, but those skipped steps are specific to devices and those specific attacks. The premise and the underlying ...


73

Am I missing something, or does this community concur that this video is either over-simplified or just plain deceitful. I wouldn't say it's deceitful, but it's definitely overhyped/oversimplified. First, the Google search he performs seems to be protected by TLS, how is that possible with just MiTM? Yes. In order to do that, he would have to either ...


1

What you want is something very hard to achieve. Just ask most massive online multiplayer games about unnoficial clients. If the attacker can run the client on a device he controls, he can change the client's code to do whatever he wants. He can learn the protocol you use, and create another client implementing the protocol. SSL will not protect you, as he ...


2

Right now, we're concerned with an attacker getting around pinning and using a proxy to be able to open the html page (by getting its URL from the proxy) in a device browser (like Chrome) outside of the app Pinning is to ensure in the client that it connects to the right server. But it looks like that this is not your actual problem. Instead you are trying ...


1

Yes, there are ways. One of them is ARP spoofing. In it, the MITM can link their MAC address with the IP address of a legitimate computer or server on the network. Then, any messages to the intended IP address will be sent to the attacker. Visit https://www.veracode.com/security/arp-spoofing to learn more about ARP spoofing. More examples of it would be: ...


0

Have you checked if the ARP table is updated on the Asus router? It could be that the router ignores the arp requests. What router do you have? Have you flashed it with some custom firmware? You can also check the arp table on your Macbook Air using the command: arp -a # to see if it has been updated.


1

Your company might have started doing a POC to acquire McAfee's CASB's product and as such is transparently redirecting some of your web traffic to their products. You might want to reach out to your administrator to get this clarified.


2

... our calling out is purely a notification of an event being sent in a fire and forget scenario In this case there is not much risk if properly implemented. Proper implementation means that any possible problems are known and addressed or that your API access is mostly independent from the rest of the application so that even unforeseen problems will not ...


6

I suspect the attack vectors for eSIMs will be largely the same as for physical sim cards, and here is my thinking: Current attack vectors The main attacks against sim cards aren't actually targeting the sim cards or the sim card media, they are targeting the processes underlying sim card registration and provisioning. Hence the popularity of sim swap ...


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