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If the underlying application is malicious, there is not really much that can be done to prevent against anything, let alone CSRF, especially when the page is being loaded inside a webview of the malicious app. As j__m mentioned, it is indeed in complete control of the webview & can choose to do whatever it wishes with it. I recently wrote a blogpost ...


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In addition to the excellent answer by @atdre, I would like to point out that the webview being able to exploit the underlying app is just one side of the story. The other side is the underlying app that may try to abuse JS interface capabilities to access (& potentially exploit) the whole of the page loaded inside the webview. I have tried explaining ...


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criminals can change these IMEI numbers in order to regain access to a network. Not only criminals, changing IMEI is easy even without root access, there are plethora of apps that can do just that. How is this done and what can I do to protect myself from it? For most devices, IMEI is stored in EEPROM, simply raising a voltage from normal working one ...


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The OAuth2 standard defines another approach to this problem, and that is to use the token revocation and token introspection endpoints. The revocation endpoint is described in RFC 7009, e.g. This revocation mechanism allows a client to invalidate its tokens if the end-user logs out, changes identity, or uninstalls the respective application. The ...


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Is there anything that makes a regular call different from an emergency call? Not physically, the signal works pretty much the same way as any other call. Phone manufacturers just add the ability to dial emergency numbers with locked phone (my Samsung allows me to add my own emergency numbers, eg. parents, so they can also be called from locked phone). ...


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